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  #11  
Old 04-10-2017, 06:15 PM
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Mineral oil, neatsfoot, something like that. Just put a drop in each hand, pull it wet from the washer and work it in. I think they make special oil for them, but I have never used it. Just used whatever I had for saddles and boots. Seems odd I know, but it works well.
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2017, 06:18 PM
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It is apparently tanned in cod oil, so try that if you can find it.

Interesting factoid off wiki

When soaked with clean gasoline, chamois will not allow water to pass through its surface fibers. This property is used to filter fuel that has been stored in drums prone to ingress of water, or from any other doubtful source. The technique is to provide a large-mouthed funnel with a wide outlet surface that supports a woven wire base, or metal plate with a grid of holes. The lower part of the funnel is tapered to fit the receptacle or tank-filler aperture.[citation needed]

A suitably sized chamois skin is soaked in clean fuel and placed over the grid in the funnel and brought up the sides, forming a bowl, to prevent any leakage past the skin. Fuel can then be pumped into the top of the funnel by the fuel dispenser and watched for signs of water accumulation. The process can be stopped to lift out the assembly from the tank and the trapped water removed so that the job can be continued. Chamois leather is used thus as a fuel filter by boaters,[8] auto detailers—and aircraft refuellers, particularly of a past age when aircraft were flown into very remote areas.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2017, 07:44 PM
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In the 15 years I've had it, my 1998 Toyota pickup has been washed about 3 or 4 times. Still looks OK after a good strong storm hits.
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  #14  
Old 04-20-2017, 07:46 PM
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I use a water blade and old cotton bath towels.

https://www.google.com/search?q=wate...utf-8&oe=utf-8
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  #15  
Old 05-21-2017, 05:59 PM
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We do sheep occasionally but never chamois, so I'm at a bit of a loss as far as the "proper" way to clean. I think Milo nailed the best way to clean it without damaging. Gentle soap, hand wash, slow dry. Its pretty generic for most common leathers (not veg). You can drag it over the edge of a table to soften it or clench it with both fists with about 6" between then touch your knuckles together and alternate rubbing. for the more lazy one can throw it in the dryer on no heat with something to fall on it that will not damage...maybe a shoe tied up in a pillowcase. Every time you "stake" or "mill" your leather you are breaking the fibers in it. If you can tolerate it being stiff after washing you should be able to wet it up and use it as normal.
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Last edited by Cavalry; 05-21-2017 at 06:07 PM.
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  #16  
Old 05-21-2017, 06:14 PM
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The sheep at the farm just down the road (circa late 1700's) don't seem particularly clean. They must stay clean from rain or licking each other. I would just grab one of the baby lambs, buff the truck and throw it back in the pasture. Let nature deal with it.
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Old 05-21-2017, 06:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USMCPOP View Post
In the 15 years I've had it, my 1998 Toyota pickup has been washed about 3 or 4 times. Still looks OK after a good strong storm hits.
Do you also (like me) swerve to hit large puddles to get it shiny clean ?
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  #18  
Old 05-25-2017, 03:20 AM
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There are 3 chamois clothes hanging on a nail in the garage. One has to be over 50 years old as it or one of them dried off a 305 Honda Scrambler when it was new in 66.

I figure holes in these things do not stop them from drying water spots off windows and windshields of my vehicks as that is the only spots that get washed.

All I've ever done is rinse with fresh water a few times and hang the same end on the nail that has the rust stains.
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