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  #41  
Old 05-13-2017, 09:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajfoxy View Post
Hi All, Lurker with a question.

Got a question for you Shade if you don't mind and as you seem to be the resident expert on the subject of cutting oils:
I have a FogBuster Coolant sprayer. Which I intend to use on my cnc router but set up manually and not hooked into the system. I am using this to cut out very thin 020 and 030 aircraft aluminum parts. What would be the best coolant to use with this unit? I had intended to use a mix of Kero and Olive oil. Three parts kero to one part olive. Now as you have made your thoughts on using Kero well known what "mainstream" oil/liquid should I be using on very thing aluminum sheet? I am using a 3mm O Flute carbide cutter.
Thanks in advance for any help, guidance, wise counsel or info on this subject.
Cheers
Anthony in Brisbane, Australia
What alloys of aluminum are you cutting?

Olive oil will provide lubricity but will oxidize readily and leave a varnish
behind, might not be a big issue on your parts but will eventually build up on
your equipment. Castor bean oil is a good option. Also you could get a good
neat cutting oil for aluminum and dilute that in kerosene.

Something like the Mobilmet 440 series of products.

What is critical for you is a ASTM D-130 with a 2A result or better,
better is a 1A or 1B.

You will get anti-oxidants in the Mobilmet that you will not get in just a home
brew oil, along with some rust protection. Also you will get a mix of lubricants
for a better performance.
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  #42  
Old 05-13-2017, 04:43 PM
ajfoxy ajfoxy is offline
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Default The stink is real. Cutting juice for the saw

Thanks for the info Shade, much appreciated.

The closest I can get here appears to be Mobilmet 414. According to the splurb it is for aluminum and aluminum alloys, magnesium, copper, brass etc.

Once again, thanks for the heads-up on what to use.
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  #43  
Old 05-13-2017, 07:53 PM
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Don't know if the info in this is of any use as it is made in Australia but it might point you to something similar. I have been using it for the last six years and never a problem.
http://www.asada.com.au/Resources/So...DS-Jan2017.pdf
I'm not very precise when I mix it, just a slosh and add water till it looks about right.
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  #44  
Old 05-13-2017, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by clive View Post
I'm not very precise when I mix it, just a slosh and add water till it looks about right.
So what "looks right..."

Blue milk... whole, 2% or skim...
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  #45  
Old 05-14-2017, 03:54 AM
ajfoxy ajfoxy is offline
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Default The stink is real. Cutting juice for the saw

Hopefully this does not come through twice as the first post just disappeared into the ether.
Clive: This is a homebuilt cnc router with a mdf spoilboard. I don't really want o use anything water based. It is a case of minimal lubricant and a fair bit of air is the way I am leaning towards.

Shade: The aluminum I am cutting is 6061 T6.
I have found a local supplier of something that might be OK. I'll find out on Monday morning if they have it in stock.
It is the following:
Tool Mate NC32 is a multi functional, general purpose neat cutting oil.
It is based on highly refined mineral oil, lubricity additives and extreme pressure additives. It protects yellow and non-ferrous metals from staining. Chlorine Free.
NC 32 is designed for general machining operations, including turning, threading, reaming, drilling and milling of cast iron, low to medium alloy steels, aluminium and copper alloys.
It is highly recommended for use on multi spindle automatics.
Excellent tool life
Excellent surface finish
Compatible with ferrous and non ferrous metals
ISO 2160 ASTM D 130 1b

Is this going to be OK for what I need?
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  #46  
Old 05-14-2017, 05:49 AM
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I would go with TiN coated End-Mills.
The TiN fills in the pores and imperfection's adds more resistance of metal bonding onto the cutter.

The issue with Aluminum is the hotter it gets the stickier it gets once it welds it self to the End-mill you lose all cutting clearances and you break the End-mill or melt the chips onto the EM.
also calculate your chip load so you are cutting more than just rubbing creating heat.


Just A note some of the cheap cutters are just colored gold and are not TiN.
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  #47  
Old 05-14-2017, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajfoxy View Post
Thanks for the info Shade, much appreciated.

The closest I can get here appears to be Mobilmet 414. According to the splurb it is for aluminum and aluminum alloys, magnesium, copper, brass etc.

Once again, thanks for the heads-up on what to use.
The 410 and 420 series are just lower treat rate versions of the 440's.
Stay away from the 700 series they will stain aluminum and copper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajfoxy View Post
Hopefully this does not come through twice as the first post just disappeared into the ether.
Clive: This is a homebuilt cnc router with a mdf spoilboard. I don't really want o use anything water based. It is a case of minimal lubricant and a fair bit of air is the way I am leaning towards.

Shade: The aluminum I am cutting is 6061 T6.
I have found a local supplier of something that might be OK. I'll find out on Monday morning if they have it in stock.
It is the following:
Tool Mate NC32 is a multi functional, general purpose neat cutting oil.
It is based on highly refined mineral oil, lubricity additives and extreme pressure additives. It protects yellow and non-ferrous metals from staining. Chlorine Free.
NC 32 is designed for general machining operations, including turning, threading, reaming, drilling and milling of cast iron, low to medium alloy steels, aluminium and copper alloys.
It is highly recommended for use on multi spindle automatics.
Excellent tool life
Excellent surface finish
Compatible with ferrous and non ferrous metals
ISO 2160 ASTM D 130 1b

Is this going to be OK for what I need?
We would call that a screw machine oil, I'd say since it is a local supplier
to run with it. You might want to try a 1:1 dilution with water first, then
increase the kerosene to get to the performance level you are happy with.

http://www.metalworkingfluids.com.au...e-NC32-TDS.pdf

Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
I would go with TiN coated End-Mills.
The TiN fills in the pores and imperfection's adds more resistance of metal bonding onto the cutter.

The issue with Aluminum is the hotter it gets the stickier it gets once it welds it self to the End-mill you lose all cutting clearances and you break the End-mill or melt the chips onto the EM.
also calculate your chip load so you are cutting more than just rubbing creating heat.

Just A note some of the cheap cutters are just colored gold and are not TiN.
DO NOT use TiN coated tooling on aluminum the aluminum will stick to
a TiN coating.

When cutting aluminum, bare carbide, TiAlN coated or PCD (polycrystaline
diamond) are much better choices.
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  #48  
Old 05-14-2017, 03:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
DO NOT use TiN coated tooling on aluminum the aluminum will stick to
a TiN coating.

When cutting aluminum, bare carbide,
I ran TiN for years on CNC,s

Between TiN and uncoated carbide.
TiN Fills in the pores in carbide, its the pores that makes the aluminum stick.
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  #49  
Old 05-14-2017, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
I ran TiN for years on CNC,s
Okay, doesn't mean it is correct. If I had a dollar for every time I saw
someone running coolant and had no clue what a refractometer was, or
how to use one I would be retired by now.

Or a nice vacation for the number of times I have been dragged in to a
customer to sort out a coolant problem for breaking taps when they were
drilling a hole for a cut tap and trying to run a form tap in the same hole.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
...its the pores that makes the aluminum stick.
You can believe what you want, but you would be wrong. The aluminum
bonds with the cobalt.

http://www.harveytool.com/cms/CoatingsChart_16.aspx

That TiB2 looks interesting, I have never seen it run, yet.

I will add that there are a ton of new coatings on the market the past few
years. I am sure there are some great ones for aluminum. TiN ain't it.
CVD is better than PVD for edge sharpness, which is critical in aluminum
machining.

https://www.radical-departures.net/a...-the-elements/
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  #50  
Old 05-29-2017, 04:02 AM
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I can answer about the bandsaw.No I don't use water based coolant. I found something new to try.I found it at our box store.

They are little plastic tubes- about the diameter of a biro but soft like electric cable insulation about 2 inches long.
The inside is filled with a lubricant paste .Lube is applied to the bandsaw blade by simply holding the edge of the tube against the moving band saw teeth and cut into the tube.

Theres just a minimum of lube smeared onto the blade where it is needed.
When the blade gets a bit loaded I run a stick of pine through it and it cleans the blade fairly well. Being late I won't take a pic but can take one if theres any interest.

Oz
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