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  #1  
Old 06-18-2017, 08:12 PM
hokie1999 hokie1999 is offline
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Default Difference in saws

Hello, can someone tell me the difference in metal-cutting bandsaw:

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...9143_200659143

and metal cutting chop saw:

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...1810_200641810

I want to cut angle iron and iron plate up to .25. Need to cut at 90 and 45 degree angles.

Thanks.

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  #2  
Old 06-18-2017, 08:32 PM
Grizz Grizz is offline
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the biggest advantage of the band saw is that you can let it cut material un attended, and bands are relatively cheap. the dry cut chop saw needs to be operated and a new blade will be spendy
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  #3  
Old 06-19-2017, 09:36 AM
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Big_Eddy Big_Eddy is offline
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I have had an abrasive chop saw for many years. I recently bought a used band saw.

Abrasive Chop Saw
Noisy
Stinky
Sparks and dust everywhere.
Goes through$6-$8 discs quickly.
Attended cutting
About 1 min for a 4" pipe.

Band saw
Quiet
No smell, no sparks, no dust
1 $20 blade in the last 3 months
About 4 mins for a 4" pipe.
Unattended - switch it on and walk away. Shuts off when done and clang of metal hitting the floor alerts me.

Since I got the bandsaw, the chop saw has not been touched.

Now the dry cut chop saw will be better than an abrasive one (more expensive blade, but no dust, no sparks) but all the other factors will be the same.
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  #4  
Old 06-20-2017, 08:33 PM
hokie1999 hokie1999 is offline
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Default Reservation

can bandsaw do angles?
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  #5  
Old 06-20-2017, 09:22 PM
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Ironman Ironman is offline
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Absolutely. The one type, cheapest, the vise swivels to 45 degrees. The better type the saw head swivels
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Old Yesterday, 12:55 AM
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arizonian arizonian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Eddy View Post
I have had an abrasive chop saw for many years. I recently bought a used band saw.

Abrasive Chop Saw
Noisy
Stinky
Sparks and dust everywhere.
Goes through$6-$8 discs quickly.
Attended cutting
About 1 min for a 4" pipe.

Band saw
Quiet
No smell, no sparks, no dust
1 $20 blade in the last 3 months
About 4 mins for a 4" pipe.
Unattended - switch it on and walk away. Shuts off when done and clang of metal hitting the floor alerts me.

Since I got the bandsaw, the chop saw has not been touched.

Now the dry cut chop saw will be better than an abrasive one (more expensive blade, but no dust, no sparks) but all the other factors will be the same.
So school me on this. I've run cold saws that turn slow with lots of coolant. Are there lots of chips, just no sparks? Eye protection mandatory?
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  #7  
Old Yesterday, 08:08 AM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
So school me on this. I've run cold saws that turn slow with lots of coolant. Are there lots of chips, just no sparks? Eye protection mandatory?
In my experience Big Eddy's quote is incorrect. The dry cut saw linked by the OP will have sparks (albeit not as bad as an abrasive saw) and will definitely have chips. They are also noisy - somewhere in between an abrasive chop saw and a bandsaw, but they are quicker than a bandsaw.

The cold saws you speak of turn MUCH slower than a dry cut saw. Cold saws generally turn less than 100 RPM whereas the dry cuts are over 1000 RPM. Id love to have a cold saw - relatively quiet with a clean accurate cut.
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  #8  
Old Yesterday, 10:31 AM
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platypus20 platypus20 is offline
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I have at least one of each of the types


1 - abrasive chop saw - I have 2 of the 14" Milwaukee saws - usually quick, but noisy, smelly, lots of sparks, very inaccurate, best to used outdoors, on the plus side , the blades are readily available and cheap (which is good, because they can and do wear out fast and they are very portable. Most the newer ones I see are very cheap, folded sheet metal bases, crappy vises. I see them for sale from $150 and up, depending on brand and quality.

2 - bandsaws - I have 3, a 7" x 14" Wilton 3410 (automatic operation), a HEM saw NG160 (manual operation) and a 14" rockwell/Delta vertical metal bandsaw - As with any bandsaw, with some time and patience, they can made to cut very accurately, Quality blades can last a long time, based on usage and some care, the cost per cut can be very low. Somewhat slower in operation, but the accuracy offsets the cutting time. A bandsaw is a larger saw than a chop saw, also needs room around it for operation. Saws are available from venders for as low as $175 (on sale) and with some set up time, can be made to cut good. Blades are made by numerous companies and can be ordered with different tooth counts, based on material being cut.

3 - dry cuts saws - I have a 14" Milwaukee using a 72 tooth carbide tipped blade - With a sharp blade, the cut quality is excellent, but blade life is directly related to the users knowledge and operation, it very easy to ruin a $125+ quality blade in about 10 seconds, Blades can be resharpened, usually in the $40-$50 range, plus the down time, unless you have a second blade. Depending on the material, you may have sparks, regardless of material, hot chips everywhere, very loud, saw need to be stout in construction, to insure the cut quality (the reason the Milwaukee and Evolution models are usually in the $500-$700 range).

4 - cold cut saws - I have a 10" Wilton - cut quality is excellent, but slow (50-100 blade rpm), needs flood coolant, usually a heavy, large piece of equipment, which directly effects the price, (most expensive type saw), usually found in an industrial setting, Blades can be expensive, but usually last a very long time.

All that said, for the homeowner or small shop, IMO, the band saw, usually gives the best performance vs price of all of the saws
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Last edited by platypus20; Yesterday at 03:32 PM.
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