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  #11  
Old 05-09-2017, 09:55 PM
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Run my saw dry mostly, will brush cutting oil onto the material being cut some times. Drill bits, mills etc, get petroleum based cutting fluids... never water based.

I just got some cutting honey (oil). I say honey because the consistency is the same. Tried it with die grinder, only time for now need to mess with it some more see how it goes.

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  #12  
Old 05-09-2017, 10:29 PM
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I work in a production shop. 5 pieces of equipment run coolant with water added (3 saws, a Hass VMC, and a beam drill line - Google Peddinghaus BDL-1250). With the exception of the Hass the equipment runes 8-10 hours a day. The Hass runs once a month or less. We have not had any problems with the coolant going rancid since switching to the coolant we use now. I suspect the saws and BDL consume/lose the coolant fast enough that it doesn't have time to go rancid. That does not explain the Hass. We have no problems with rusting, even on the Hass. When a piece does not run for a period of time horizontal surfaces exposed to coolant develop a film on them. I am not aware of any biocide treatments, and I know we don't use skimmers or check the coolant concentration - ever. I'm not saying this is good practice, it is what it is.

At home, even doing a light production run I cut dry. It's rare that I use coolant while drilling aside from the occasional deep hole or if production drilling. Don't beat up on me too bad Shade, but in those cases I grab what ever aerosol lubricant happens to be handy - solely to keep the bit cool. Here's my uneducated take on it - heat is the enemy, lubrication is for reducing friction, if you think you are benefitting by lubricating a cutting tool your tool is probably doing a lot of rubbing not cutting.
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  #13  
Old 05-10-2017, 02:31 AM
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Quote:
We have not had any problems with the coolant going rancid since switching to the coolant we use now.
I'd appreciate your checking on what brand/numbers etc on this if possible.

While I may just be fucking stupid, the point was in my asking a question and not asking for a consensus on whether someone does or does not use coolant for cutting. Not having looked at the specifics of this water soluble oil I appreciate your pointing the fact out with color.

JbFab, I would appreciate your checking for, if possible, that info.

I do at times cut dry, but not as a rule.

My initial question still stands.
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  #14  
Old 05-10-2017, 08:00 AM
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Well, we've all tried coolant , and all had it go bad, just like you have experienced.

As well as coolant everywhere (on the floor, along a 20' length of stock, etc)

And it appears none of us have found a solution other than "Dry" or "lightly oiled".

It could be JBFabs coolant is terribly expensive, unable to get in small qty's,
or it may actually be a viable solution.

We shall see, when he comes back with a part number ...eh ?
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  #15  
Old 05-10-2017, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
I work in a production shop. 5 pieces of equipment run coolant with water added (3 saws, a Hass VMC, and a beam drill line - Google Peddinghaus BDL-1250). With the exception of the Hass the equipment runes 8-10 hours a day. The Hass runs once a month or less. We have not had any problems with the coolant going rancid since switching to the coolant we use now. I suspect the saws and BDL consume/lose the coolant fast enough that it doesn't have time to go rancid. That does not explain the Hass. We have no problems with rusting, even on the Hass. When a piece does not run for a period of time horizontal surfaces exposed to coolant develop a film on them. I am not aware of any biocide treatments, and I know we don't use skimmers or check the coolant concentration - ever. I'm not saying this is good practice, it is what it is.

At home, even doing a light production run I cut dry. It's rare that I use coolant while drilling aside from the occasional deep hole or if production drilling. Don't beat up on me too bad Shade, but in those cases I grab what ever aerosol lubricant happens to be handy - solely to keep the bit cool. Here's my uneducated take on it - heat is the enemy, lubrication is for reducing friction, if you think you are benefitting by lubricating a cutting tool your tool is probably doing a lot of rubbing not cutting.
It is spelled Haas. VF-2? or bigger?

What coolant are you running? What concentration and is someone using a
refractometer to control concentration? or are they just adding a X% all the
time and not accounting for evaporation. Does the film wash off with water?

Production shops benefit from coolant and the machine you run are generally
better designed for coolant. Most of the hobby machines are not. I remember
a shop, that had a dozen or so Bridgeports all in a line there were troughs in
the floor that ran along the front and in back of the machines when they ran
coolant they just let the mess run to the floor and drain to a tank to be filtered
and run back. The place was a mess. He ran the cheapest coolant he could
find it also smelled like a cess pool. Typical Polish machine shop. They still
ran brazed carbide tooling and sharpened by hand. Always wondered if they
are still in business...

You might want to get some solid lubricant sticks, I have a stick of Castrol 140
stick wax, I snagged them when I left Castrol back in the 1990's, I have used
a little more than half the tube in 20 years. Also air tool oil is not a bad
cutting oil, general they have some tackifier that helps keep it on the tool.
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  #16  
Old 05-10-2017, 08:38 AM
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Jason, I try to avoid aerosols in the shop as you never know where the overspray lands. Not to mention you breathe it too. Just a general
avoidance. I do use some but try to avoid as much as possible.
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  #17  
Old 05-10-2017, 09:23 AM
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I had the same question years ago
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  #18  
Old 05-10-2017, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
It could be JBFabs coolant is terribly expensive, unable to get in small qty's,
or it may actually be a viable solution.
I do a lot of cutting making my gun parts as well as a big range of differing metals to support this as well as a butt load of projects.

Like Shade has mentioned, use and/or circulation daily or if I'd use the saw every weekend I'm sure I'd get more life with the fluid and I have noticed this as being true.
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  #19  
Old 05-10-2017, 11:26 AM
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This is what we use in our shop. We get it from Alro.
We also fill bottles from the saw to use as drilling coolant and sometime on the mill.

We are very hi tech for the solution mixture. I add water from the inside rain barrel that is roof filtered, and then will add the coolant till it looks the right color. Sometimes, if I notice some rust forming on the table, I know I need to add more coolant. Sometimes the water from the leaking roof will dilute it too much.

The first saw gets used daily. The second saw might get used once a month, often setting for several months without using. I have not known this to turn rancid and smell bad. We probably went a couple of years between cleaning the dump tank. It was a little grimey in the bottom when we did it earlier this year.



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  #20  
Old 05-10-2017, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Well, we've all tried coolant , and all had it go bad, just like you have experienced.
I have never had rancid coolant, blasphemer!

Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
As well as coolant everywhere (on the floor, along a 20' length of stock, etc.)
Yup been there done that, stopped using coolant. The lost money in labor did
not make up for the minor savings in tool life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
And it appears none of us have found a solution other than "Dry" or "lightly oiled".
And that is not necessary a bad solution, I think that an MQL solution sounds
like a good alternative for Jef. He deals with warm humid weather most of the
time and that is conducive for microbial growth. An oil or ester based
lubricant run in a mist unit might be a very good solution.

I have a Trico mister on my Mill, never used it...
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