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  #11  
Old 06-01-2017, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by LW Hiway View Post
So Brian, if one side went out, how much wear do you see on the other? After all that time to pull and remove things to get at a problem on one side....................I'd be thinking about pre-fixes.

Looks like one involved job with all of the hydraulics alone. But you guys just amaze me with abilities.


I was thinking about pulling the other side down to look. At the very least the chains probably need tightening. There was some chain wear on the sprocket guard on the broken side.

I also have to look at the motor mounts. The back of the motor will sway pretty much when pulling on the levers.


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  #12  
Old 06-01-2017, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
I would agree that the shaft doesn't look the best, so I did check on a replacement shaft. Obsolete part. The motor is also crossed to a new number. Only $1058 to replace it. I think I am going to run it like it is and see how long it lasts. I will try to baby it too. At least it is not a machine I use daily to make my living. Just makes my life easier around the yard.


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Could you machine a new shaft?
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2017, 09:16 PM
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I have for hydromac which is also Gehl on axle shafts . Roughest part is splines Trial and fit best approach.
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  #14  
Old 06-01-2017, 09:44 PM
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Could you machine a new shaft?


If I really wanted to, I probably could. All I would need is someone to tell me I couldn't do it and I would to prove them wrong. . I would be concerned about the strength. I'm sure it would need some heat treating to get it right, and I would be concerned I wouldn't get it right. But then again, I guess I could take the old gear and maybe make it a square drive instead of the spline drive. I probably might consider that vs buying the new motor. My time is cheap compared to taking it to a shop. And by then, I should be pretty good at taking it apart.Click image for larger version

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  #15  
Old 06-02-2017, 04:28 AM
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If that is the other side Looks just as bad. ?

If the old sprocket is soft, weld in a splined coupler.

http://www.surpluscenter.com/Power-T...413-1-1392.axd



They have sprockets with other types of splines that may fit cheaper motors.
in other words buy a cheaper motor and find a matching sprocket.

http://www.surpluscenter.com/Hydraul...R-9-4873-I.axd
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  #16  
Old 06-06-2017, 11:35 AM
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I have a friend coming over to see if he if he might be able to get the shaft. He rebuilds hydraulic parts at his job.

The sprocket will file so it is not super hard. The file will not touch the motor shaft. I cleaned up the shaft last night and was thinking of the possibility of a BMR (base metal repair). I would like to try to do this without taking the pump apart. Yeah, I know not the best or right way, so maybe I am trying to do this again later. I am thinking of adding weld to the outer 3/4" of the shaft and then grinding it in by hand with a dremel grinder to fit the sprocket a little tighter. The sprocket has maybe 1/32 of rotation slop now. I would try to keep the welds small to keep the heat down from ruining the motor seal.


If I was to try this, what would anyone suggest for the rod to use? Stick vs tig.

Like I said before, i probably would not do this for any one else, and at work, but I mostly have my time to lose here, and don't want to part with $ if I can help it. I will regret that later


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  #17  
Old 06-06-2017, 11:39 AM
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Brian this is in no way a solution but what if you drilled and tapped several holes around the gear splines to tighten it up by inserting bolts? I'd be afraid of welding changing the temper and shearing the shaft in short order.

There's no real solution to this but to replace the shaft and that doesn't make fiscal sense. Been there done that.
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  #18  
Old 06-06-2017, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by SmokinDodge View Post
Brian this is in no way a solution but what if you drilled and tapped several holes around the gear splines to tighten it up by inserting bolts? I'd be afraid of welding changing the temper and shearing the shaft in short order.



There's no real solution to this but to replace the shaft and that doesn't make fiscal sense. Been there done that.


The first challenge of that is drilling and tapping the hardened shaft. Next challenge would be getting it together. It is designed that the sprocket is held into the bearing with snap rings, and the motor can just slide in and mount with two bolts. I don't think I could get the other bolts in afterwords.

I might just put it together like it is and see how long the sprocket lasts. I already bought it, and if it doesn't last long, then I will look at a replacement motor and machine what I have to make it work. But I think it will last several more years for me. It isn't like I am working it to make a living every day.


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  #19  
Old 06-06-2017, 02:34 PM
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Instead of traditional repair methods something from Henkel might solve your slop problem:

http://www.na.henkel-adhesives.com/u...F_LR881364.pdf

Much love for welding and machining but tech has come a long way. You can contact customer service if in doubt. Not enough people think in terms of industrial solutions. I look at those first even if I choose a traditional method later because the options are interesting.

I've not used Loctite 660 but the price isn't bad:

https://www.amazon.com/Loctite-Quick.../dp/B001GSKUZU
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  #20  
Old 06-06-2017, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
The first challenge of that is drilling and tapping the hardened shaft. Next challenge would be getting it together. It is designed that the sprocket is held into the bearing with snap rings, and the motor can just slide in and mount with two bolts. I don't think I could get the other bolts in afterwords.

I might just put it together like it is and see how long the sprocket lasts. I already bought it, and if it doesn't last long, then I will look at a replacement motor and machine what I have to make it work. But I think it will last several more years for me. It isn't like I am working it to make a living every day.


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Gotcha. I said bolts earlier but was thinking set screws.
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