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Old 12-11-2017, 07:04 AM
steve56 steve56 is offline
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Default lincoln powermig 210mp vs. miller multimatic 215

I am a retired coal fired power plant mechanic welder. Certified in 6g stick pipe welding with some mig experience. I am looking to buy a machine for home/hobby use and need input on pros and cons for the Lincoln Powermig 210MP and the Miller Multimatic 215. Thanks.
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:14 AM
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Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
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I have no experience with the miller, but I have owned a lincoln 210 since about june last summer.

I am very happy with the mig performance, I have run .030 and .023 solid wire, and a little bit of fluxcore on jobs ranging from autobody panels to 1/4 inch steel. I have always been a fan of lincoln's crisp arc and I also own a lincoln 216 and they run pretty similar. If you are used to a miller mig you may prefer it, but I can't see anyone not being able to live with the arc on the lincoln.

For stick welding I have run 6011 in 1/8 inch and 3/32(hobart rod), and some 1/8 inch 7018 (lincoln rod). Used it on 1/8 inch up to 1/4 inch with some vertical and overhead mixed in. My first couple beads out of the box I wasn't super happy with, but this machine allows you to adjust the hot start and arc force and after dialing those in I think it is a dream to run. I have seen some reviews where guys say it is a mig welder with SOME stick capability, and if you are used to running a high end dedicated stick machine that may be true but after years of running buzz boxes and old transformer machines I am really happy with the 210.

I bought mine to use for portable work and have run it off of 120V and 220V. It is a much more capable machine on 220, but welds very nice on 120. On one job fixing grain bins I was able to plug into a 30 amp 120V outlet and it ran like a champ on a 100ft extension cord. On a 15 amp outlet I have had trouble popping breakers.

I really like the user interface and how you just pick a process and a material thickness. The cord ends are all twist lock and you can switch processes in about 2 minutes, maybe less. Never have to take the mig gun off of the machine, so no threading wire when you switch back and forth between stick and mig.

I haven't used mine to tig weld. It only does lift arc, and doesn't have AC capability. I may buy some cables and try it sometime, but if I was going to do much tig welding I would probably buy another machine with a foot pedal and AC capability. You can add a pedal to the 210 but it gets pretty expensive.
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Old 12-11-2017, 10:06 AM
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Many of the smaller inverter welders, on the market, will not run 6010 worth a crap, they will run 6011, 7018 and other rods very well. If you feel the need to run 6010, then an actual prepurchase test of both welders is necessary. I have no reason to doubt their mig capacity or operation, it’s the stick part that would concern me.
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Old 12-11-2017, 11:05 AM
metalbndr metalbndr is offline
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No experience with the Miller. Did some three point hitch mods on a seven ft blower with my 210. Involved 2.5x.188 sq tube, 2.5x.5 and 2x.5 flat bar. Ran 3/32 7018, beveled joints. With some rod manipulation, the welds were great, smooth operation, 90 to 100 amps.
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Old 12-11-2017, 12:55 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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No experience with that particular miller, but love every other one I have or have tried.

My buddy got a group deal with a few other guys on the 210 MP's

3 of the 4 were lemons out of the box. Couldn't hold constant voltage during MIG. It was quite a run around, and in the end the buddy who organized the group buy upgraded to a 350 to be satisfied. The one thing I can say positive about the 210 MP is that the user interface is nice. I wouldn't buy one of the 210 MP's - my 2% of a buck.
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Old 12-12-2017, 06:23 AM
steve56 steve56 is offline
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Thanks for your replies. I have heard that replacement parts especially the main circuit board are a lot less money on the Miller. Anyone know anything about that?
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Old 12-12-2017, 10:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve56 View Post
Thanks for your replies. I have heard that replacement parts especially the main circuit board are a lot less money on the Miller. Anyone know anything about that?


Hopefully if you stick with Lincoln or miller, you should not need any main board parts. That is why they cost so much. Or they will stand behind their welders down the road, at least for the 3 year warranty period. (Are they still doing 3 year warranty?)


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Old 12-12-2017, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve56 View Post
Thanks for your replies. I have heard that replacement parts especially the main circuit board are a lot less money on the Miller. Anyone know anything about that?
This LINK will take you to another thread about a Lincoln 180 I picked up as a "refurb". Apparently, not much refurbing happened... But the story has a happy ending.
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Old 12-18-2017, 12:47 AM
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Just for your info.. Different Miller, and Lincoln Inverter machines can have a night, and day difference in mig arc quality.. Meaning there are Lincoln Inverters that have a softer arc then Miller does on it's inverters, and the other way around too. Of course inductance, wire brand,gas, and slope play a roll too. The Miller 215 will be one of the Crisp-arc machines with low spatter.. (Meaning good to me) You get some slope adjustment on the Miller but no Inductance control like the Lincoln. Properly designed inverters can get away without a inductance control, and just might be a plus for some people.. It's all really comes down to what the Welding design engineers decide what they want in a machine.. Many more get it right now, and even filters down to the low rent China stuff.. Can have a flat out excellent mig arc,and as good as any high end machine..Sometimes better..
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