Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Welding

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 09-25-2017, 09:20 AM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,469
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Thanks, G. There is information in those links that I hadn't read before.

I did not understand why there were 2 sieves.

Dr. Bob talked about the sieve several years ago but not in detail. I was amazed then, and I still am, that they can separate 2 gases that way.


+1. Now the question is, as a welder, can I utilize this technology to separate the Gas's and then fill my tanks for torch work? And what good is nitrogen gas for in the welding field. Would be nice if it could be a replacement for argon!


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-25-2017, 05:22 PM
monckywrench's Avatar
monckywrench monckywrench is offline
trust but verify
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 4,174
Default

I've been intrigued by concentrators for a long time.

Some jewelers and glassblowers use concentrators to feed their torches. You can sometimes find them on Craigslist or Facebook marketplace. I haven't scored one yet since I want the pump style designed to fill medical cylinders.

For very high volume cryo is the way to go but portable concentrators are used by the military and small civilian users. Cryo ensures liquid oxygen oxidizes any foreign nasties in the liquid oxygen. That's one reason private pilots often transfill their cylinders off welding oxygen cylinders by use of a transfill whip (basically some Western high pressure fittings, a whip and a gauge or a tee to use an oxygen regulator as a gauge and dump valve which is how I do small cylinders).

Bulk hospital use of concentrator oxygen would require local quality monitoring and a clueful operator. Civilian hospitals may or may not want to maintain their own oxygen plant for liability as much as space and staffing reasons.

Why the military likes concentrators:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...yI1Offs3IIR-iA

Aircraft OBOGS aren't quite right yet. The main reason for OBOGS was originally to get rid of the base LOX plants to save manning. That was thought up long ago during the cancelled F-20 program.

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone...is-more-likely

As a former crew chief I consider OBOGS an overly complex substitute for the old, reliable LOX bottles. Servicing those was no big deal and two airmen could keep up with a squadron in wartime.

BTW nitrogen cannot replace argon or other shielding gas because it is not inert.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.