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  #1  
Old 08-12-2017, 07:56 PM
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cramd cramd is offline
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Default Quick and dirty hose pinch off project

I am going to bleed the brakes on my truck after changing out the brake fluid, but the bleeder screws have never really been touched since the truck was new in October of 2006, and are being stubborn about turning.

I have managed to get the rear ones to move, but the screws no longer have any wrench flats on them courtesy of a pair of Vice Grips, so I ordered new screws, and will replace the original mangled ones with brand new OEM parts that I picked up today.

I don't want to hot swap them and possibly end up with all my new brake fluid pooling on the ground under the truck, so I fabricobbled together a brake hose pinch off tool from a pair of Craftsman Vice Grip clones (never did like the way those worked). Since I wasn't too attached to the tool as manufactured, I didn't feel too bad about subjecting them to some grinding and welding on of some attachments designed to make my job a tad easier and less messy.

I think the pictures should tell the tale without any written narrative (besides which I just got hollered at to get upstairs and fire up the BBQ )
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  #2  
Old 08-12-2017, 08:17 PM
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Recycling and functional in one!

You should be able to slide a piece of hose over the end of the barb/nipple on the bleed screw and the other end into a container. That will also help catch fluid. (Whether it's an old or new screw.)

Time for a new signature line!!
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  #3  
Old 08-12-2017, 08:41 PM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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"Hot swap" ????

Not wanting brake fluid on the ground ?

I've done many brakes, and never pinched off anything.
You don't want to damage the rubber hose in any way.

Put a pan under the work area to catch the brake fluid, and you'll
need to flush the system as well, so if it runs out, so be it.
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Old 08-12-2017, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
"Hot swap" ????

Not wanting brake fluid on the ground ?

I've done many brakes, and never pinched off anything.
You don't want to damage the rubber hose in any way.

Put a pan under the work area to catch the brake fluid, and you'll
need to flush the system as well, so if it runs out, so be it.
Over the years, I have also done a few brake jobs, including replacing vacuum boosters, the hydro boost on this truck, rebuilding wheel cylinders, replacing hoses/banjo bolts/copper washers and what not, so this isn't my first rodeo. I know what can go wrong, and I want to be prepared ahead of time to limit any problems that may occur. I also have brake bleeding tools/hoses/catch cans etc. but none of these are usable until after the screws have been replaced.

The main reason I thought of pinching the brake hoses was in case I have trouble getting the old bleeder out, and the new one in expeditiously. I have arthritis in my hands which makes doing something that needs a bit of finesse a whole lot harder than it should be. Doing a job with the truck up on ramps also doesn't leave me a whole lot of room to move around in under there, and I am most assuredly nowhere near as flexible as I was 50 years ago (neck and shoulder arthritis, and back problems), so I want to make this job as easy as possible.

If I don't need to pinch the hose, I won't, but the fertilizer can hit the windmill unexpectedly, and I don't need that.
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Old 08-12-2017, 09:40 PM
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I still don't understand.

If you dig out the bad bleeders, and the replacement ones don't fix, just use
the catch pan and take your time finding the proper ones.

Who cares if the whole system drains out ?

As I said before, you need to flush the system once in awhile.

Also, as of late, I am seeing the rubber hose's delaminate on the inside
causing major problems (must be chineese made junk) so any crimping/pinching
is off my list. I don't let the caliper hang on them either when changing pads.

If you really, really must stop the flow, jam something in the end of the fitting.

Here in the Kommonwealth of Pennsylvania, we have vehicle inspections, and one that fails
allot of people, is near the ends (next to the crimp) is a bubble between the layers.

BTW I have tried grease, never seize, etc. The best thing to help stop
the bleeder nut from rusting in place is that little rubber top hat
cover your supposed to put on when done bleeding.

Last edited by digger doug; 08-12-2017 at 09:52 PM.
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  #6  
Old 08-12-2017, 10:19 PM
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cramd cramd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
I still don't understand.

If you dig out the bad bleeders, and the replacement ones don't fix, just use
the catch pan and take your time finding the proper ones.

Who cares if the whole system drains out ?

As I said before, you need to flush the system once in awhile.

BTW I have tried grease, never seize, etc. The best thing to help stop
the bleeder nut from rusting in place is that little rubber top hat
cover your supposed to put on when done bleeding.
It is not the bleeders not fitting that I am concerned about, it is the fact that I have problems with stiff, arthritic fingers that feel like dead sticks at times, and getting something started straight in the hole when I can't get a good look at what I am doing.

I worked for years on stuff where I often could not see a damn thing due to very constricted spaces (i.e.working bare handed in bitterly cold temperatures on 1/4 or 3/8" stainless tubing and fittings with half my arm inside an 8" I.D tube, and trying like hell not to cross thread the fittings I was working with). My days of being able to do that are long gone, but the problems that kind of work left me with are still here.

I am the one who cares if the whole system drains out. I don't need the mess, I don't need the added expense of getting to go to the parts store and pick up more brake fluid, and I don't need the added work on top of what I already had planned. My temper can get short enough when things go relatively smoothly, but when they go crossways, , I don't need that either; my blood pressure is high enough already.

As far as the rubber bleeder screw covers, they are in place, and have been since I picked up the truck in 2006 (44km/27.3 mi. on the odometer when I signed the papers), but they don't go all the way down to the caliper, so some of the threads are exposed, and there is enough rust in that area to make getting them out difficult. I don't live in either the Canadian or American rust belt, but stuff does rust here, just not to the same degree.
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  #7  
Old 08-13-2017, 05:57 AM
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terry lingle terry lingle is offline
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You ould try what My dad did 45 years ago on a new to him 2 year old dodge PU.
At that time almost every thing had four wheel drum brakes.
He was greasing the truck and worked them until the bleeders took grease a lot of grease because they obviously had not been greased before
I lived 10 +driving hours away and got to make a weekend run to replace the wheel cylinders seals and shoes and get the brakes working again. not much sleep that weekend.
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  #8  
Old 08-13-2017, 08:07 AM
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Cramd, It started out being a good idea to share. I have a heater hose on a machine clamped off right now with a vise grip and two flat washers. Good thing I didn't post that

Brake fluid is hydroscopic, and there is no hope to stop rusting in a situation where the fluid is sucking water. I recently replaced the rear calipers on my truck because one seized. I had surprisingly very little to no loss of fluid from the lines when I unscrewed them. If you are alone when bleeding, and even if not, shove a bit of 1/4" fuel hose or plastic aquarium tubing onto the nipple and into a jar to catch it all.

FWIW, in the future, when ever I do brake jobs, I am going to replace the calipers, too. It costs $40 for a rebuild kit, $120 for a new caliper, and with the $60 core charge the cost is $20 more than rebuilding it.

Can you get a helper to screw in the new bleeders for you?
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  #9  
Old 08-13-2017, 11:02 AM
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Crushing brake hoses is a very, very, bad idea.


I like the pinch off tool design, if I'm in a "pinch" I'll borrow the idea for heater hose.
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  #10  
Old 08-13-2017, 11:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinDodge View Post
Crushing brake hoses is a very, very, bad idea.


I like the pinch off tool design, if I'm in a "pinch" I'll borrow the idea for heater hose.
I have to agree with this ^^^^......but then I agree with Gerry too. And on a 10+ yr. old truck, I'd consider replacing brake hoses with the calipers.
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