Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Welding

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 07-18-2017, 09:27 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Maineville Ohio
Posts: 672
Send a message via AIM to Rufus Send a message via Yahoo to Rufus
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Then you don't need 7018, 601X will be just fine, remember A36 hot rolled steel is only 36,000 psi yield strength.


The past few days have left me very irritable.

I just need my co-workers to do what the fuck they are paid to do...
The older I get the more I understand work place violence.
Shade:
Sounds like you have had it pretty rough as of late. I know what it's like for co-workers not to pull their load. I have seen that many times while in the Air Force. I am praying for you that things will get better

Thanks
Tim
__________________
Hey! What do ya'll say we go to Wallys house?!?!?!
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 07-18-2017, 10:04 PM
digr's Avatar
digr digr is offline
The Real Deal
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duluth MN
Posts: 6,776
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
Just out of curiosity have you ever, on pipe, tiged the root pass? I ask because I have heard that sometimes the root pass is tiged and also, why would a root pass be tiged and not ran with a 6010? Also, has there ever been a time when a pipe job calls for a root pass to be done with a 6011 or is it always with a 6010?

Thanks
Tim
The only pipe that I have used tig for the root was stainless pipe and never have used 6011 for a root pass.
__________________
Drawing by Smartdraw
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 07-18-2017, 10:34 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Maineville Ohio
Posts: 672
Send a message via AIM to Rufus Send a message via Yahoo to Rufus
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
The only pipe that I have used tig for the root was stainless pipe and never have used 6011 for a root pass.
Ok. Thanks for the info. I should have known that stainless pipe, for the root pass, would be tiged.

Thanks
Tim
__________________
Hey! What do ya'll say we go to Wallys house?!?!?!
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 07-18-2017, 11:08 PM
camdigger's Avatar
camdigger camdigger is offline
Roving Reporter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Central Oilberta
Posts: 3,175
Default

We built a small gas processing skid in Turkey. We had some onsite repairs done after the unit was put in service. There were two crews in two separate sessions one crew did all scratch start TIG to do the repairs on 2" carbon steel piping, and the other used 6010 root/7018 cover and fill passes.

Some of it is designer discretion. In the above case, I think it had a lot to do with who was available to come do the work.
__________________
Design to 0.001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit..
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-19-2017, 02:57 AM
OZWELDER's Avatar
OZWELDER OZWELDER is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Mackay, Queensland.Australia
Posts: 518
Default

Would you guys have heard of doing open root pipe beads on pipe with low hydrogen stick electrodes?

There is a Japanese electrode, the Kobe LB 52 U which gives an tig quality bead in the hands of the a competent welding operator.

The Kobe's are a thin fluxed electrode to get easily into the root prep with far less sparks and smoke than a traditional fire stick.

The down side was they were expensive back in the 90,s like $60 Au pkt.

God knows what they would be now.
__________________
Ozwelder
May your chooks turn into Emus and kick ya dunny down.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 07-19-2017, 10:22 AM
mccutter's Avatar
mccutter mccutter is offline
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 7,066
Default

What about creating a pressure vessel and purging with Nitrogen? Or Argon?
__________________

TA Arcmaster 185 w/tig/stick kit
MillerMatic 252 w/3rd gen 30A
MM140 w/o AS, w/CO2
Hobart (Miller) 625 plasma
Hobart 250ci plasma
Victor O/A (always ready, but bored)
Lincoln Patriot autodark (freebie)
45ACP Black Talons for those stubborn jobs...
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 07-19-2017, 11:34 AM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 17,550
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
Shade:
Sounds like you have had it pretty rough as of late. I know what it's like for co-workers not to pull their load. I have seen that many times while in the Air Force. I am praying for you that things will get better

Thanks
Tim
Use your prayer for Tim's Dad and Cutter. My problems can be solved with
judicious use of Single Malt Scotch and a Louisville Slugger as needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
What about creating a pressure vessel and purging with Nitrogen? Or Argon?
Okay, I am going to use the chemist's version of the word 'salt'. A salt in that
world is molecule that has an ionic bond. So salt petre, potassium nitrate is a
salt so is sodium chloride (rock salt or table salt) ammonium nitrate (fertilizer)
is a salt, borax is a salt, this was discussed in one of Jen's threads in
blacksmithing. There are lotsa of salts out there.

Some salts are hygroscopic, this means that the salt will incorporate water
into its crystal structure. The salt hydrate (i.e. borax decahydrate) is still a
powder, and dry to the touch. The water become part of the crystal.

People tend to think that the compound is just wet and it can be dried like a
towel on the clothes line. It cannot, there are chemical bonds that are holding
the water to the crystal structure, often changing the structure itself.

The only way to displace the water of hydration is to heat it, and drive it from
the structure, heat is need to break the bonds.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_of_crystallization

http://www.lethbridgecollege.net/ele..._hydration.pdf

By the way I use an old lab oven to dry my rods. You might want to look on
craigslist for the same. Make sure it is 14" deep.
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.