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  #21  
Old 11-18-2016, 08:27 AM
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Bender Bender is offline
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I would think about resale value as well, especially with or without an engineering stamp.

Are all the quotes for non engineered?
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  #22  
Old 11-18-2016, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtrojcak View Post
... and flexible ag series building system ....
It's a hay barn!!! Its' only for ag applications. I am pretty sure if you ever got into an insurance claim for anything other than ag stuff, they would disallow the claim. Unless you are storing hay walk away.

If you are putting your good stuff, cars, tools workshop etc get a proper building.
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  #23  
Old 11-18-2016, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtrojcak View Post
From the lowest bidder's website FAQ page:


What is the difference between welded and bolted metal buildings?

Welded buildings refer to an economical and flexible ag series building system that utilizes 4-1/2” steel pipe uprights that go through the slab and are encased within a concrete pier (thus removing cross bracing that is common in a bolted system). Standardized framing is used on every building such as 6” or 8” x 2.5” 14 ga. cee purlin spaced 5’ or less on roof.
4” x 2.5” 14 ga. cee purlin spaced 5’ or less on walls. Wall purlin is saddle welded onto side of pipe upright creating a 4” flush girt wall and maximizing the amount of usable space in your building.
Bolted buildings refer to completely custom software designed building system that calculates material sizes and gauges based on building dimensions, building location, bay spacing, door & window locations, etc. Purlin or beam uprights are anchored to the top of the slab, framing connections are bolted using clips, and cross-bracing is often required which may affect your usable bays. The engineering calculations automatically generated make this system beneficial in building applications that require windstorm, permit, or engineer certification.
Sounds to me that they have this pretty well thought out. I can't argue with their design logic either. The wall cee purlins are a good idea as well.
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  #24  
Old 11-18-2016, 11:01 AM
dtrojcak dtrojcak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bender View Post
I would think about resale value as well, especially with or without an engineering stamp.

Are all the quotes for non engineered?
One of them said I could get the wind rating certification for an extra fee.
He also said that all of their buildings are built the same way and that the wind rating was only required on the coast for hurricane reasons.
As far as resale value, it's a welded building, so won't be taking it apart to sell it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RancherBill View Post
It's a hay barn!!! Its' only for ag applications. I am pretty sure if you ever got into an insurance claim for anything other than ag stuff, they would disallow the claim. Unless you are storing hay walk away.

If you are putting your good stuff, cars, tools workshop etc get a proper building.
Ag applications apply to more than just hay.
There are many buildings built similar to this that have $200k-600k+ worth of tractors, combines, harvesters, hay cutters, hay bailers, etc sitting under them.
Besides, other than my $1500 flatbottom boat, everything else in my shop will be ag related.

Quote:
Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Sounds to me that they have this pretty well thought out. I can't argue with their design logic either. The wall cee purlins are a good idea as well.
That was my initial thoughts as well.
I have no doubt that the 4.5" pipe will be strong enough for my purposes, I was simply curious if I-beam uprights were worth the extra $10k-15k cost.
Undoubtedly the I-beams would be stronger, but would it be necessary?
A 40' tandem axle, dual wheel flatbed gooseneck trailer will haul a lawnmower just fine, but a 5'x8' trailer will be more than enough trailer for the same job.
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  #25  
Old 11-18-2016, 12:06 PM
dtrojcak dtrojcak is offline
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I received the response about upgrading the 4.5" pipe to square tubing.
It would be a total increased cost of $650.
I am considering going to the square tubing just for aesthetic reasons to have all flat surfaces if nothing else.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
The problem with tubing is it can rust from the inside out and be to late when it collapses.

Toyota is now having a big recall on truck frames that are rusting from inside out.

I assume you will need to buy certified tubing that is coated inside.

Just a cheap fence I built 1/16" wall thickness the horizontal runs rusted out from the inside out in about 12 years.
I appreciate your input, but a 1/16" thick pipe that is sitting out in the elements for 12 years is a totally different scenario than 1/4" thick painted pipe shielded from the elements by a sheet of metal.
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  #26  
Old 11-18-2016, 12:38 PM
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Have you considered getting a quote from Mueller for a materials quote for comparison?
I was pleasantly surprised at the cost & the structural quality when I build my little shop about ten years ago.
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  #27  
Old 11-18-2016, 03:43 PM
dtrojcak dtrojcak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Have you considered getting a quote from Mueller for a materials quote for comparison?
I was pleasantly surprised at the cost & the structural quality when I build my little shop about ten years ago.
I actually did that yesterday.
I am now waiting on bids to erect it.

I'm hoping it will come out a little cheaper if I get the slab, building, and construction from separate companies.
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  #28  
Old 11-18-2016, 05:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
The problem with tubing is it can rust from the inside out and be to late when it collapses.

Toyota is now having a big recall on truck frames that are rusting from inside out.

I assume you will need to buy certified tubing that is coated inside.

Just a cheap fence I built 1/16" wall thickness the horizontal runs rusted out from the inside out in about 12 years.
It has been my experience that it WILL rust from inside, depending on your climate some last longer but eventually they will rust out.
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  #29  
Old 11-18-2016, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtrojcak View Post
I actually did that yesterday.
I am now waiting on bids to erect it.

I'm hoping it will come out a little cheaper if I get the slab, building, and construction from separate companies.

Seeing how your post above stated that they eliminated the wind bracing
by putting the post' below the slab lead me to believe that
the slab need poured by the same people installing the steelwork.
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  #30  
Old 11-18-2016, 07:35 PM
dtrojcak dtrojcak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Seeing how your post above stated that they eliminated the wind bracing
by putting the post' below the slab lead me to believe that
the slab need poured by the same people installing the steelwork.
I never stated that they eliminated the wind bracing.
One of the companies that I received a quote from stated that the wind rating certification, which is only required on the coast, would cost extra.
He also stated that all of their buildings are built the same way, so it would still be engineered for the wind rating, it just wouldn't have the papers saying so.
It's sort of the same thing as buying a full-bred animal vs a registered animal.
Both are the same thing, just one of them has papers saying so.

The lowest bid company is the one with the round pipe through the slab.
If they are the "winner", then yes, I would need to use them for everything.

Sorry for the confusion.
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