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  #11  
Old 03-02-2017, 07:14 PM
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Always thought it odd that normal jobsite power tools had to be 120V over there and therefore require these transformers. Australia, NZ, and Papua New Guinea are 240V mains, and all the power tools are 240V, too. They even came with extra brushes oftentimes because they would wear out faster on 240V; something we rarely see in the Americas.
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  #12  
Old 03-02-2017, 07:36 PM
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I think the "120 vac at the jobsite" rules are new.

If you take our "American 240vac" and take either wire to ground what
voltage do you get ? 120 vac.
Only getting between both hot's will get you 120 vac.

EDIT: "Only getting between both hot's will get you 240 vac."



Whereas with the British 240 vac (if I am correct) there is
only one hot and a worker is easy to get a full 240 vac,
by touching the only hot, and being grounded.

Last edited by digger doug; 03-02-2017 at 09:02 PM.
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  #13  
Old 03-02-2017, 07:51 PM
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I've been hearing about 120V tools and jobsite transformers in the British Isles for at least 15 years.

I think you typo'd the American 240V hot-to-hot.

Correct that Euro/Aussie 240V is hot-to-neutral/ground.
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  #14  
Old 03-02-2017, 08:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
I think you typo'd the American 240V hot-to-hot.

Correct that Euro/Aussie 240V is hot-to-neutral/ground.
Uhm, no I think I got it right.

Please explain some more.
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  #15  
Old 03-02-2017, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Uhm, no I think I got it right.



Please explain some more.


You had hot to hot is 120v. Phone probably auto corrected you.
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  #16  
Old 03-02-2017, 09:00 PM
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Oh I see the typo now.

Thank you
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  #17  
Old 03-02-2017, 10:53 PM
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When did they go 120 for portable tools. Back in the 70's Mcgraw tool built 240 for the British Market .Normal 120 tool with a down transformer and English Plug .Pain in the butt ,glad we built them on a special run.I was die casting and it took a different die for room for transformer.
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  #18  
Old 03-03-2017, 04:34 AM
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16 replies!! thanks folks, not gonna be able to respond to everyone individually.


No idea how long the 110 thing is around, I remember my dad borrowing a demo breaker from work with a 110 box when I was less than ten so it's definitely on the go for 30 years.

On a jobsite depending on how big the operation you'll have a yellow box like keith posted and then leads and distribution boxes a gogo.

On a big site that could potentially mean a transformer on a pallet size.

I bought this saw about 10 years ago, complete with transformer. Normally when these things are overloaded they have a thermal cutout on them and stop working. I have overloaded this one in the past alright using a hired core drill but in that case the drill worked fine, it was the box that stopped until it cooled.


When the saw dies, it gets extra gutless then stops and wont run again for a minute or two, the longer you leave it, the longer it will run for the next time. the exact symptoms of overheating, but the saw doesnt feel hot.


I hadnt considered the brushes as there's no light show inside the motor which I would have taken as a good sign?

All I've had a chance to do is check the rating on the transformer, the label is worn off! I bought them as a pair so never really considered the box could be the issue, but I've been looking at transformer specs here http://carroll-meynell.com/products/...l-transformers and just going by weight I'd say I could well be undersized.


I dont get why they're rated in KVA always too. I know that's the proper way to rate a transformer, but nothing you plug into a transformer has a KVA rating. the label on the tool lists volts, amps and watts. This calculator would suggest to me that I need a 1.5KVA continuous rated transformer. the first site has their 1.6 continuous transformer at 18kg, no way mine ways that, closer to 10.

I'll test to see if there's a voltage drop when running and try and get my hands on a bigger yellow box at the weekend to see how the saw runs with it.
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  #19  
Old 03-03-2017, 10:44 AM
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From this description the problem is probably inside the saw.
A couple of easy tests will confirm or reject this. first possibility try a different similar rated saw on the transformer. It will either work properly or fail just as your saw does. Alternately try your saw on a different transformer again same possibilities.
The background possibility is that the "transformer" is not a metal and copper transformer but is an electronic converter and has internal problems.
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  #20  
Old 03-03-2017, 10:48 AM
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it's definitely just a transformer, no electronics inside them at all.
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