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  #41  
Old 03-15-2017, 10:46 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Your link did not work for me. Is this the lathe?
Chris:
That's the one. Thanks for pointing out that the link wouldn't work. I went ahead and edited the link in my posting.

Again, thanks Chris. I really appreciate it
Tim
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Last edited by Rufus; 03-15-2017 at 10:52 PM. Reason: To many "again's" Thanks.
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  #42  
Old 03-15-2017, 11:21 PM
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Chris:
That's the one. Thanks for pointing out that the link wouldn't work. I went ahead and edited the link in my posting.

Again, thanks Chris. I really appreciate it
Tim
Your very welcome. The only thing I would suggest is to get a different tool post. Try one like the Aloris AXA tool posts. Simplifies switching from one tool bit a-to another. There are other tool posts that have the same design as the Aloris. You can find them on Ebay. I am getting anxious to see you do your first turning now!
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  #43  
Old 03-15-2017, 11:33 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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[QUOTE=milomilo;683352]Your very welcome. The only thing I would suggest is to get a different tool post. Try one like the Aloris AXA tool posts. Simplifies switching from one tool bit a-to another. There are other tool posts that have the same design as the Aloris. You can find them on Ebay. I am getting anxious to see you do your first turning now!

Chris:
Patience, patience, patience lol. In due time Chris it shall come to pass When I buy the lathe, and it will be that Grizzly (that has the link to it) I will look into the tool post you mentioned.

Thanks
Tim
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  #44  
Old 03-16-2017, 01:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
...When I buy the lathe, and it will be that Grizzly (that has the link to it) I will look into the tool post you mentioned...
Before you run out and buy that lathe I would highly recommend that you look at something bigger. A 7 x 14 is just a toy and I think it would be no time at all till you were very disappointed. If you have any aspirations whatsoever of doing work for other people you need to find something larger and heavier...
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  #45  
Old 03-16-2017, 02:30 AM
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Before you run out and buy that lathe I would highly recommend that you look at something bigger. A 7 x 14 is just a toy and I think it would be no time at all till you were very disappointed. If you have any aspirations whatsoever of doing work for other people you need to find something larger and heavier...
What size would you recommend?

Thanks
Tim
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  #46  
Old 03-16-2017, 04:37 AM
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What size would you recommend?
Tim, most of our recommendations or helpful hints on these kind of purchases that we would offer to an entry level person such as yourself would be based on our collective past purchases. Most of which we would be saying that we had aspirations to do a few specific things of a sort of random sizings and quickly ran out of capacities with the initial tooling bought. This shit is rampant and happens with regularity.

That said, trying to gage our future needs at any particular early time in these ventures have usually meant that we soon grew out of what we settled for in size and ability. Case in points would be Welding machines of less than 200 amps or so for an entry level machine. Going to the low end of capacities usually mean that in short order, we've out grown what we considered an adequate purchase only to be found wanting in a year or so down the road once our abilities increased as knowledge is learned.

Not to be long winded..................the mill lathe combo model as you've posted have many thousand small scale projects for the hobbyist all over the world. With a good dose of patience and ingenuity included into the mix.

I've got a friend in LAF, LA, that has made several dozen RC sized gas and diesel motors for his aircraft. He's currently working on his 2nd radial engine for a 1/8th scale biplane on a lathe mill combo like you posted mostly scratch built assy's. He's happy as can be as he is also at the short end of the stick considering shop space.

So what all of this I speak is just a word of caution when it comes to purchases such as these when your learning curve is at the very beginnings of ones abilities.

It all comes down to what you can afford. Entry level abilities as well may inhibit your buying a larger used lathe as some of the upkeep or tending to problems to fix at a beginners level may also cause mass quantities of aggravation and hinder your enjoying these toys for or from a hobbyist point of view.

Granted a year or two down the road you may quickly out grow this initial purchase, but, when the time comes to upgrade to something larger, you'll know when that time comes.

I purchased a smallish 9" Logan lathe from one of our good members here at SFT. I knew at the day of purchase that it was too small for the bulk of what I wanted but it fits in with a tooling repairing type of shop. I also knew that it was only a matter of time before I fell into a deal like the larger used lathe I purchased form another member that handles the wealth of larger stuff. (South Bend 13"x 60") Well, guess what, there are times that I could make use of a 20" + swing as well.

So, rest assured that no matter what your decisions turn out to be, just think of it as temporary because these dens of hobby horrors like some of us tinker with, well, most of us are always on the look out for the next big toy........It's addictive, hard on the wallet and not always to the liking of a spouse or live in girlfriend.

Hell, my Dog gives me dirty looks every time I show up with a good sized trailer full of good tooling.
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  #47  
Old 03-16-2017, 08:12 AM
projectnut projectnut is offline
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Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Naw...forget about the night school classes.
Those who know...do, those that don't ....teach.

Convert that lathe, and we will get you going.
That's not necessarily so. Some that know also teach. In many cases the "night school" classes are run by journeyman machinists or master tool and die makers as part time jobs.

A few years ago I was looking for a surface grinder for my shop. I happened to talk to a co worker who was sending a number of new hire industrial mechanics to the local technical college for "basic training". He mentioned he'd taken a tour of the place and was impressed by the multiple high end machine shops and the quality of the tooling they had. Among the machine tools were about a dozen different brand, style and type grinders.

I contacted the school to get a tour and see if there was any way I could use some of the grinders to determine which would be the best fit for my shop. During the tour I was alerted to the fact that there were a series of night classes that were open to both novice and experienced machinists.

I signed up for a class and went to the first session. The instructor was a local journeyman shop owner who was contracted by the school to conduct the evening classes. The class itself was somewhat of an open format. In order to be able to operate any given machine without the instructor present the student had to show the instructor that he/she knew not only how to operate the machine but also be versed in the setup, safety precautions, and operating limits. Once the instructor was satisfied the student was proficient the student could run the machine unsupervised.

For the novice students the instructor would demonstrate each of the machines functions, how to set it up, and instruct the student in the necessary safety practices. The instructor would also either assign projects or allow students to bring in their own projects and help them through all the stages from material selection to completed project.

With my work schedule I wasn't able to attend all the classes and try out all the grinders in one semester. I got about half way through trying out the machines when the semester ended. Rather than make a possible mistake when purchasing a machine I decided to hold off the purchase. I reenrolled the following year for a second go around to test the remaining machines.

This class is still held every second semester of the school year, and as far as I know is still taught by the same instructor. He's a young (relatively speaking) and ambitious person who loves the industry and is trying to encourage others to enter the field.
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  #48  
Old 03-16-2017, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Before you run out and buy that lathe I would highly recommend that you look at something bigger. A 7 x 14 is just a toy and I think it would be no time at all till you were very disappointed. If you have any aspirations whatsoever of doing work for other people you need to find something larger and heavier...
Go bigger AND cheaper. Yeah it might need a little work, but you can learn as you go:

https://dayton.craigslist.org/tls/6036940291.html

If you want it, I can help you retrieve it.
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  #49  
Old 03-16-2017, 01:33 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Originally Posted by gimpyrobb View Post
Go bigger AND cheaper. Yeah it might need a little work, but you can learn as you go:

https://dayton.craigslist.org/tls/6036940291.html

If you want it, I can help you retrieve it.
I appreciate the offer, but I would prefer to have one that would work out of the box, so to speak so I can get to work fast and besides I would have to make room in the garage for it. During the day the mom keeps the car outside so I can piddle around out there and at night she pulls it into the garage. The garage is piled deep on one side with junk. My side is where I do my work and of course in between the junk and my work space is where mom parks her car.

Thanks
Tim
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Last edited by Rufus; 03-16-2017 at 01:56 PM. Reason: I had to add more wording. Thank you.
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  #50  
Old 03-16-2017, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Your very welcome. The only thing I would suggest is to get a different tool post. Try one like the Aloris AXA tool posts. Simplifies switching from one tool bit a-to another. There are other tool posts that have the same design as the Aloris. You can find them on Ebay. I am getting anxious to see you do your first turning now!
Careful that Aloris AXA tool post is half the price of the lathe. I have that tool post and is top notch, I was extremely lucky to get one.


a more realestic tool post just examples:
https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...ory=-419988835

lathe
https://littlemachineshop.com/?Sourc...FdgNgQodQLwNFQ

Rufus,

To get a good in the middle lathe not too small and not over size, plan on gathering 2.5 - 3k.

IMO, this company does a betrter jod than Grizzly
http://precisionmatthews.com/index.html

Just adding to the conversation

Greg
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