Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Machining

Canaweld
SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 03-16-2017, 05:33 PM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Albuquerque NM
Posts: 3,162
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
I appreciate the offer, but I would prefer to have one that would work out of the box, so to speak so I can get to work fast and besides I would have to make room in the garage for it. During the day the mom keeps the car outside so I can piddle around out there and at night she pulls it into the garage. The garage is piled deep on one side with junk. My side is where I do my work and of course in between the junk and my work space is where mom parks her car.

Thanks
Tim
Step 1 Get rid of the "Junk" and you'll have more room for TOOLS. :-)
...lw...
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 03-16-2017, 07:05 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Maineville Ohio
Posts: 634
Send a message via AIM to Rufus Send a message via Yahoo to Rufus
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
Step 1 Get rid of the "Junk" and you'll have more room for TOOLS. :-)
...lw...
Step 2 Get rid of the "car" and I will have even more room for TOOLS :-)

Thanks
Tim
__________________
Sit down Tiffin...I'll go.

Last edited by Rufus; 03-16-2017 at 07:06 PM. Reason: Needed to emphasize the word "TOOLS". Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 03-16-2017, 07:31 PM
cutter's Avatar
cutter cutter is offline
Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Lubbock,Texas
Posts: 31,327
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pepi View Post
Careful that Aloris AXA tool post is half the price of the lathe. I have that tool post and is top notch, I was extremely lucky to get one.
Unless they've made a radical change, Aloris does not make a tool post for any mini-lathe.
Even an AXA is too big.


Quote:
Originally Posted by pepi View Post
a more realestic tool post just examples:
https://littlemachineshop.com/produc...ory=-419988835
That's what I bought for my little Atlas/Craftsman 6/18. It is a perfect match and has held up suprisingly well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepi View Post
That little lathe is a much better choice than the Grizzly mini-lathe for about 25% more money.

Rufus, someone needs to let you in a little reality check here:
Notice the tooling starter sets on the Little Machine Shop lathe page? You may as well buy at least the $200 set before you ever chuck up anything in the lathe and then you'll need at least a cheap digital caliper if you don't have one. As Old Man observed, we're used to measuring things with a tape measure & that don't cut it anymore.

No matter what kind of small or mid-sized lathe you end up with, the machine itself is going to cost less than the tooling, measuring tools & accessories and all the other necessary goodies you will need.
Buying the lathe & thinking you're ready to go is about like buying a casket and thinking you paid for a funeral.
That just ain't how this works.

I have a good example sitting in my shop and several threads about it posted here. I paid $300 for a worn out little Craftsman lathe and we rebuilt and upgraded it right here over the course of a very long thread. By the end of the first year I had spent at least another $1000 on parts and "accessories" and I'm probably up to $2000 by now.
Bear in mind, that I did all of that for the experience and for the thread itself, not because the lathe was worth it. It wasn't and it still ain't.
Little Charlie has been useful but it certainly is not a two thousand dollar lathe.
But we all had a really good time building the thread.

Take your time, learn as much as you can, read as much as you can instead of making your mind up & buying the first cheap, shiny thing someone recommends.
I am not trying to discourage you. But you should be aware that buying a machine tool is just the first step on a long shopping spree.
__________________
cutter
Housekeeping Staff
Director of Policy, Syntax and Grammar (by appointment)

If Ă˜bama had a son he'd look like Mohammod Abdulazeez.

Let them eat hope.

"Dr. Chandran, will I dream?"

Janet Reno killed more children at Waco with Bill Clinton's permission than Adam Lanza killed at Sandy Hook.
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 03-17-2017, 12:56 AM
LKeithR's Avatar
LKeithR LKeithR is offline
Hey...wait...is there a prize?
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Langley, B.C.
Posts: 3,942
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
What size would you recommend?
As others have said, a lot depends on your intended use. If you never plan to work on anything but small stuff than a 7 x 14 or an 8 x20 might be big enough for you. But if you're like most hobbyists or backyarders you'll quickly discover that there are many other things you want to work on and that your lathe simply isn't big enough.

In my view the ideal size for a general purpose hobby-oriented machine is either 13 x 40 or 14 x 40. These are certainly a lot bigger than the 7 x 14 you're talking about but if you do get very serious about machining you'll quickly understand why I consider them to be an ideal size. They'll easily handle pipes or round bars up to 6" or so in diameter while still being "dainty" enough to work on pins and rods down to 1/8". And while most work on a lathe will happen in the first 10"-15" out from the chuck something will come along to make you appreciate the 40" distance between centres...
__________________
Keith

Measure twice and cut once...or...wait, was that the other way around?
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 03-17-2017, 02:19 AM
LKeithR's Avatar
LKeithR LKeithR is offline
Hey...wait...is there a prize?
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Langley, B.C.
Posts: 3,942
Default

Was just doing some browsing on Craigslist and noticed this. If you're looking for a compromise between a 7x14 and a 13x40 this would be ideal. It's a 10x24, made in Taiwan--I've always been impressed by the older Sharp lathes and this one looks to be in pretty good shape to boot. Look at the depth of the bed; for its size this would be a pretty rigid machine.

I'm not suggesting you run up here to buy it but it is a good example of what you could be looking for...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Lathe1.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	33.2 KB
ID:	138364   Click image for larger version

Name:	Lathe2.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	45.6 KB
ID:	138365  
__________________
Keith

Measure twice and cut once...or...wait, was that the other way around?
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 03-17-2017, 09:54 AM
monckywrench's Avatar
monckywrench monckywrench is offline
trust but verify
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 4,122
Default

I have one of those (that style older Taiwan lathe is common) branded Skyline and like it. I'll eventually add (not "replace with") a larger lathe but it's fine for most of what I do.

Enco also sold some solid lathes in the past. My pro machinist buddy uses his more than his larger (and VERY nice) WWII vintage American Pacemakers. It's made him money every day for many years.

Driving several hours to get a good tool is worth it. Fuel is cheap. Figure how many hundred miles won't hurt your feelings or budget then search in that range.

You can rent drop deck trailers to make moving much easier.

Lathes are tippy so I put outriggers under them for stable moving. Not strictly necessary but it makes movement safe and easy. Lathe in crappy pic is my Skyline.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...9/#post2641882

If you put together a moving "kit" you can add to it over time. Comealongs, heavy duty ratchet straps, and a variety of jacks are nice to have for many things.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 03-17-2017, 03:01 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Maineville Ohio
Posts: 634
Send a message via AIM to Rufus Send a message via Yahoo to Rufus
Default

[QUOTE=LKeithR;683411]Was just doing some browsing on Craigslist and noticed this. If you're looking for a compromise between a 7x14 and a 13x40 this would be ideal. It's a 10x24, made in Taiwan--I've always been impressed by the older Sharp lathes and this one looks to be in pretty good shape to boot. Look at the depth of the bed; for its size this would be a pretty rigid machine.

I'm not suggesting you run up here to buy it but it is a good example of what you could be looking for...[/QUOTE

Keith:
That lathe does look like it will fit the ticket. My plan is to become more efficient in welding and do other metal projects and I would like to get to the point to where I could do some side line business in producing some pieces for money. If others have done it before me and are doing it at the present time then I know I can do it. The only "machine tools" I have at this moment are an 8 inch drill press, an 11 inch drill press, a 4 and a half inch angel grinder and a 6 in bench grinder and I will even throw in my dremel knock off tool. I want to branch off into doing other metal working.
Sorry to be so long winded. I get like that sometimes

Thanks
Tim
__________________
Sit down Tiffin...I'll go.
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 03-17-2017, 03:45 PM
mccutter's Avatar
mccutter mccutter is offline
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 6,946
Default

[QUOTE=Rufus;683442]
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
...what you could be looking for...[/QUOTE <<<<<<MISSING "]"

Keith:
...Sorry to be so long winded. I get like that sometimes

Thanks
Tim
Tim:
I don't what you are doing but you are losing the last bracket of quoted text. All you need do is go back and "edit" the post and add the bracket. Then the quoted text will appear correctly. You can also edit/delete text within the quote if it doesn't apply to the point you were quoting.
__________________

TA Arcmaster 185 w/tig/stick kit
MillerMatic 252 w/3rd gen 30A
MM140 w/o AS, w/CO2
Hobart (Miller) 625 plasma
Hobart 250ci plasma
Victor O/A (always ready, but bored)
Lincoln Patriot autodark (freebie)
45ACP Black Talons for those stubborn jobs...
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 03-17-2017, 06:13 PM
pepi's Avatar
pepi pepi is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Woodstock, GA
Posts: 110
Default

[QUOTE=cutter;683382]Unless they've made a radical change, Aloris does not make a tool post for any mini-lathe.
Even an AXA is too big.
/QUOTE]

I was not suggestion that it would. I was pointing out and I may have misunderstood the post that suggested the OP buy such a QCTP In the post I linked a QCTP and block kit that would be a better option @ 130 bucks.

Aloris AXA is a stout beast that nobody can deny..I can tell you that and worth every penny..

Greg
__________________
I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmmyMGQojzI
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 03-17-2017, 06:50 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Maineville Ohio
Posts: 634
Send a message via AIM to Rufus Send a message via Yahoo to Rufus
Default

[QUOTE=mccutter;683444]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post

Tim:
I don't what you are doing but you are losing the last bracket of quoted text. All you need do is go back and "edit" the post and add the bracket. Then the quoted text will appear correctly. You can also edit/delete text within the quote if it doesn't apply to the point you were quoting.
Thank you very much for that bit of information. I was wondering why my replies were coming out like that and now I know why

Thanks again
Tim
__________________
Sit down Tiffin...I'll go.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.