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  #11  
Old 06-30-2017, 09:41 PM
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Stainless pulls so much I swear it's got legs and walks all over the place.
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  #12  
Old 07-01-2017, 07:51 AM
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Milo, I started using lay wire. On the post base plates, it was easy to walk the cup for me. On all the other joints, it was not so easy for me since the contours changed, so at first I was trying to dab the filler in, but did not do it consistently enough to get a uniform bead. I was trying to keep the bead looking uniform so I did not have to grind them all for looks.

So far I am only grinding the top handrail portion of the rail that people will be using. The rest of the welds are just being shined up with scotchbrite pads on the air grinder.

I am having issues keeping my hand steady as I progress around the joint. I was pulsing the pedal and dabbing the filler, and managed some nice looking beads in spots, and then would loose it in the transition, or have to wait until the rail cooled to flip it over and reclamp down.

Some of my welds I am proud of, others not so much. Does not help that my natural state is to rush things and get it done and useable. Having to slow down and make it look like a showcase is against my grain. These rails will be front and center in a busy summer town ice cream shop for a builder that we do some structural steel for. Want to make sure that they can be a rail that he can use as a reference for his customers as to the type of work that we can do. I can only hope that the boss does bill according to what it really takes to do this, and make it look this well. I have been having to go back and straighten some of the warped welds.

I have been using this rail to try and help a new kid in the shop though. I have been doing all the work myself for the most part, but have been explaining to him what to focus on if he really wants to become a good welder in one sense. Practice keeping your beads uniform. Find a style of bead that you like, and practice that until you can do it in any position. Nothing looks worse than several different beads styles on the same piece. Now, if only I can do it myself, I will be a good welder!




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  #13  
Old 07-01-2017, 11:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clive View Post
Stainless pulls so much I swear it's got legs and walks all over the place.
Mmmmm, yeah. ..that just about sums it up....
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  #14  
Old 07-09-2017, 06:48 AM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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I can't tell from the dimensions on your plans just how far that extension extends below the bottom step. A protrusion of 12" into the landing is required by ADA if that matters to your customer.
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  #15  
Old 07-09-2017, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Spencer View Post
I can't tell from the dimensions on your plans just how far that extension extends below the bottom step. A protrusion of 12" into the landing is required by ADA if that matters to your customer.


They only extend out around 10" inches or so, just enough to get to about 38" tall from the walk. This is what the architect designed, so this is how we built it. We only had input on the plates we mounted with, and the boss did change how we returned the rail back to the post. He didn't like the architect bringing the bottom in horizontal, and wanted to parallel the top. Of course this did make the joints harder to weld and grind. just another day at the office.


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  #16  
Old 08-03-2017, 10:45 PM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Nice looking handrails! My coping tool is one of my sons with a 1/2 round double cut hand file, for the handrail I'm making. I'll get my money's worth out of him one of these days.
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