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Old 04-20-2017, 07:33 PM
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Default SS turnbuckles

Fabbing up some SS turnbuckles. Actually bought the turnbuckles, but have to fab/ weld the ends on, and the rods mounting to the wood walls and roof overhang they will be holding up.

Have about 10 hours into it so far threading 12 pieces of 1" SS round 1 1/2-2" long, and milling the other end for two plates to be welded on.

I drew the plates up in turbo cad and sent the drawing to Alro and they laser it them out. They came out pretty well. I don't even have to debur the holes, they are that clean, the bolts will slip right in.

I did figure out that I should have made the sides a little smaller for welding onto the milled ends. Boss said I could mill them down but I really don't want to take the time. Hopefully I will get these made in under the quote time.
I bent up a piece of steel strapping into a z shape to keep the mill hold down pushed up when I loosened the bolt to make switching the shafts quicker. Worked great!

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Old 04-20-2017, 08:10 PM
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Threading Stainless is not easy
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Old 04-20-2017, 08:16 PM
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Threading Stainless is not easy


Especially with old worn out dies! I threaded about half the thread using the lathe first, and then finished them with two different dies. I was surprised how well they came out. Only had one that some of the threads came out bad.


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Old 04-20-2017, 10:26 PM
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...they laser it them out. They came out pretty well. I don't even have to debur the holes, they are that clean, the bolts will slip right in...
That's what I like about laser cutting; it's clean and accurate. We've had a ton of laser cutting done in the last 11-12 years--somewhere between 150 and 160 tons of 3/16 and 10 GA steel plate. All for a line of bus/advertising benches that we build. We also get a lot of one off and specialty stuff cut as well. Something complex will probably get laser cut if there are more than a few involved. If we're really busy it's often more cost effective to have parts cut and concentrate on assembly and welding--if we're quieter and looking for things to keep busy then we're more likely to hand fab parts...

Quote:
...I bent up a piece of steel strapping into a z shape to keep the mill hold down pushed up when I loosened the bolt to make switching the shafts quicker...
That's a neat idea--consider it stolen! I do the same thing sometimes with a piece of packaging foam.
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Old 04-20-2017, 10:28 PM
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...I threaded about half the thread using the lathe first, and then finished them with two different dies...
How come? If I had gone to all the trouble of setting up to thread the parts I'd just keep going and finish them--no need for a die...
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Old 04-21-2017, 05:27 AM
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How come? If I had gone to all the trouble of setting up to thread the parts I'd just keep going and finish them--no need for a die...


Time mostly. Plus I didn't take time to properly sharpen the tool bit for this size of threads. I could only cut about half depth.

I think if I had a lot of them to do, I probably might have talked the boss into buying a set of dies for the pipe threader. I think I got sticker shock the last time I looked up does for stainless though. of course, I probably would have been done in less than an hour instead of 3-4 hours threading.


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Old 04-21-2017, 08:39 AM
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Time mostly. Plus I didn't take time to properly sharpen the tool bit for this size of threads. I could only cut about half depth...
Insert tooling my boy, insert tooling--gotta get yourself set up with the good stuff so you can breeze through jobs like that.

Quote:
...I think if I had a lot of them to do, I probably might have talked the boss into buying a set of dies for the pipe threader. I think I got sticker shock the last time I looked up does for stainless though. of course, I probably would have been done in less than an hour instead of 3-4 hours threading...
Yeah, I know what you mean, to thread SS you'd definitely need the HSS dies and, especially compared to the carbon steel ones, they're pretty pricey. We've got a Ridgid 300 but it doesn't really get used that much because of the cost of the dies and we seldom run into jobs that involve enough volume to justify the cost...
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Old 04-21-2017, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Insert tooling my boy, insert tooling--gotta get yourself set up with the good stuff so you can breeze through jobs like that.



we seldom run into jobs that involve enough volume to justify the cost...

We have "machine shop" in our name but actual machine work is probably less than 5%of our work, partly due to the age of our machines and lack of dedicated machinists. I think the boss would rather spend the money on labor paying a guys wage vs spending the money on tools that only be used for one job.




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Old 04-21-2017, 11:21 AM
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Progress of work.
Ready for tacking.
Tacking up.
Tacked up.
Jig for welding up.
Welded up. By the end got the beads to look nice and uniform.

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Old 04-21-2017, 11:25 AM
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Default SS turnbuckles

The ears warped in on most of them so had to spread them back out a little. Two wedges and a hammer took care of that!


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Last edited by toprecycler; 04-21-2017 at 11:26 AM. Reason: Add photo.
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