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  #81  
Old 08-07-2017, 04:17 PM
Old Croc Old Croc is offline
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Gerry, you have not mentioned how you are going to level it up and secure it to the floor. I have just bought a new mill, similar size and I am unsure how to go about it. Any help would be appreciated.
rgds,
Crocy.
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  #82  
Old 08-07-2017, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Old Croc View Post
Gerry, you have not mentioned how you are going to level it up and secure it to the floor. I have just bought a new mill, similar size and I am unsure how to go about it. Any help would be appreciated.
rgds,
Crocy.
Welcome to the site, Old Croc.
I may be just being ignorant, but this is a 3200 pound lump of cast iron, and I have no plans to bolt it down at all. I think getting it to move to where I want it is going to be a major heavy rigging job. Right now it is sitting on a pallet in the welding bay getting more annoying every time I walk around it. I have trammed it, and done a little work where it sits, and have another job to do on it. I have to keep it covered from the welding area grit and filth.

Where it will end up is inside a seacan which is my machine shop area. I plane to place it in there, snake it by a 15 ft long workbench, and move it 40ft in total to the far end of the can. This will require removing my lathe which is in the way, or moving it downstream and over to line up with the bench. I am putting it off to try and get some help, I have done heavy rigging in mines moving jaw crushers underground, etc so have an idea of what to do, but it takes a long time alone.

If you have a stable floor, even a wood floor which can support the weight, I see no reason to do anything more then position it. If your floor is springy, but you feel it will hold up, then I suggest putting a sheet of 1/2" or 3/4 plate under it to spread the load. If your floor is not level....well that is another barrel of fish. Then you might want to cut a hole in the floor and pour a concrete pad to set it on.

Here is "The Official Proper Footing Plan" from Lagun for my mill. As you can see, if you are mounting it in a rose garden you will need a 9 inch thick block of concrete almost exactly in the shape of the cast iron base. They say if mounting it in an upper floor then have it near a column, I assume to support the weight.
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It is tempting to blame others for all this, especially those in control of the system, but don’t forget that for decades you voted for people who routinely lied before elections, and told you what you wanted to hear, that you could have it all right now and to hell with the future – well, that future has now arrived. Clive Maund

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  #83  
Old 08-07-2017, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
Welcome to the site, Old Croc.

I may be just being ignorant, but this is a 3200 pound lump of cast iron, and I have no plans to bolt it down at all. I think getting it to move to where I want it is going to be a major heavy rigging job. Right now it is sitting on a pallet in the welding bay getting more annoying every time I walk around it. I have trammed it, and done a little work where it sits, and have another job to do on it. I have to keep it covered from the welding area grit and filth.



Where it will end up is inside a seacan which is my machine shop area. I plane to place it in there, snake it by a 15 ft long workbench, and move it 40ft in total to the far end of the can. This will require removing my lathe which is in the way, or moving it downstream and over to line up with the bench. I am putting it off to try and get some help, I have done heavy rigging in mines moving jaw crushers underground, etc so have an idea of what to do, but it takes a long time alone.



If you have a stable floor, even a wood floor which can support the weight, I see no reason to do anything more then position it. If your floor is springy, but you feel it will hold up, then I suggest putting a sheet of 1/2" or 3/4 plate under it to spread the load. If your floor is not level....well that is another barrel of fish. Then you might want to cut a hole in the floor and pour a concrete pad to set it on.



Here is "The Official Proper Footing Plan" from Lagun for my mill. As you can see, if you are mounting it in a rose garden you will need a 9 inch thick block of concrete almost exactly in the shape of the cast iron base. They say if mounting it in an upper floor then have it near a column, I assume to support the weight.


Thinking about this, how heavy is most Bridgeports? 2000lbs? I do not have mine at work bolted down either. Just shimmed on four corners to level up. Would it be best to grout under it and then bolt down to help take out any vibration? We tend to think 2000lbs is heavy, but vibrations can move and multiply, right. Would this help in taking heavy cuts?

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  #84  
Old 08-07-2017, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Thinking about this, how heavy is most Bridgeports? 2000lbs? I do not have mine at work bolted down either. Just shimmed on four corners to level up. Would it be best to grout under it and then bolt down to help take out any vibration? We tend to think 2000lbs is heavy, but vibrations can move and multiply, right. Would this help in taking heavy cuts?

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No, I don't believe it would allow heavier cuts, that's horsepower, but cutting smoothly while doing it may be helped.
The one at work you shimmed up, I think grout is a more permanent fix than wedges, because they will work loose.
Been using mine like a lathe this rainy afternoon.
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It is tempting to blame others for all this, especially those in control of the system, but don’t forget that for decades you voted for people who routinely lied before elections, and told you what you wanted to hear, that you could have it all right now and to hell with the future – well, that future has now arrived. Clive Maund

Even duct tape can't fix stupid ... But it can muffle the sound.
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  #85  
Old 08-07-2017, 09:54 PM
Old Croc Old Croc is offline
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Hi Gerry and Brian,
Thanks for the welcome and the replys. I have been a member for a while, but rarely log on, just read and ponder. I have received some replies from other forums and several people have said to raise it 4 to 6 inches for ergonomics, on hardwood blocks and just put in the 2 front bolts to prevent any movement.
My next question is do I just shim it, as its on a concrete floor until the table is perfectly level from L to R and front to back, using my machinists level?
At 3200lbs, yours is a fair bit bigger than this one at 2240lbs.
thanks again,
Crocy in Australia.
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  #86  
Old 08-07-2017, 10:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Croc View Post
Hi Gerry and Brian,
Thanks for the welcome and the replys. I have been a member for a while, but rarely log on, just read and ponder. I have received some replies from other forums and several people have said to raise it 4 to 6 inches for ergonomics, on hardwood blocks and just put in the 2 front bolts to prevent any movement.
My next question is do I just shim it, as its on a concrete floor until the table is perfectly level from L to R and front to back, using my machinists level?
At 3200lbs, yours is a fair bit bigger than this one at 2240lbs.
thanks again,
Crocy in Australia.
Welcome to the site. You do want it at a comfortable level for your height. If you have to bend over to operate it raise it up. Hardwood blocks will do that nicely. Level is also important as well. Some use hickey pucks to elevate and to take out some of the machine vibration too. I use rubber blocks under my lathe and it eliminated all the vibration. Highly unlikely your mill will move anywhere, IMHO.
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  #87  
Old 08-08-2017, 07:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Croc View Post
I have received some replies from other forums and several people have said to raise it 4 to 6 inches for ergonomics, on hardwood blocks and just put in the 2 front bolts to prevent any movement.
My next question is do I just shim it, as its on a concrete floor until the table is perfectly level from L to R and front to back, using my machinists level?
At 3200lbs, yours is a fair bit bigger than this one at 2240lbs.
thanks again,
Crocy in Australia.
Those guys must be really tall. Most operators, me included, have to get a step stool to get at the drawbar, without raising it up. Fact is, I'd lower it if I could.

To level, that's all you can do to level it.
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It is tempting to blame others for all this, especially those in control of the system, but don’t forget that for decades you voted for people who routinely lied before elections, and told you what you wanted to hear, that you could have it all right now and to hell with the future – well, that future has now arrived. Clive Maund

Even duct tape can't fix stupid ... But it can muffle the sound.
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  #88  
Old 08-08-2017, 08:10 AM
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The infamous Franken-Mill and the Jet JVM 836 mill, set on heavy duty plastic pallets, with a 1/2" steel plate, covering the top of the pallet, then the mill/plate/pallet sandwich bolted together. This widens the mill base to 40" x 48" and enables the mill to be moved around, with a pallet jack.
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  #89  
Old 08-08-2017, 12:25 PM
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greywynd greywynd is offline
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At 6'2", I find most standard mills (9-10" x 42" long table size, or an 'average' bridgeport) a bit low, particularly when trying to see fine work.

A larger, heavier mill, like the one Gerry has now, is a good table height for me, and I'm on the limit for reaching the drawbar. Some I can, some I need a stool.

Personally, I've likely used over a hundred different mills of various types and sizes, and have never actually seen one bolted to the floor yet. It's the weight and build of the machine that will determine rigidity, and most bridgeports/vertical mills I can often run out of horsepower when doing heavy stock removal.

Time for a new signature line!!
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  #90  
Old 08-08-2017, 10:43 PM
Old Croc Old Croc is offline
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Thanks everyone for the comments. This one has a 36 inch table and comes in clean at 2200lbs and it appears a bit low for me so on some nice 4inch Aussie hardwood blocks she shall go.
kindest regards,
Crocy in Aus.
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