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Old 07-28-2017, 10:12 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Default Welding Nuts

I'm looking for tips on welding nuts. I've done this a few times in the past without issue, but it was never for anything critical and I probably just got lucky. I'm going to weld a few nuts tomorrow, so I thought I'd do a search here for some knowledge, but didn't really find any relative topics.

In the past, I've tig welded stainless steel nuts to mild steel. i haven't done it in years, so I don't remember why I chose SS nuts, nor do I remember what filler rod I used. I do remember threading in a bolt, before welding the nuts, to help with distortion, but that is about all I remember.

So, please feel free to chime in with any tips and tricks you have. I'm especially interested to learn if there is any kind of lubricant I should put on the threads before welding. I'd also appreciate a reminder on what filler I should use if I do weld SS nuts to mild steel.

Edit: Is it 309 I want to use for filler? For some reason that is what just popped into my head.
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Last edited by Spencer; 07-28-2017 at 10:38 PM.
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Old 07-28-2017, 10:19 PM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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Thread a bolt onto the nut, extending out the other end, wrap a couple of wraps of tape onto the threads.

It will keep the bolt centered in the hole, so when the normal bolt needs
to go in, it won't be binding on the edge of the whole.

Most people I know think they can re-tap afterwards, but it's hard to get it
to cut on the side.
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Old 07-29-2017, 12:12 AM
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Unless you really need stainless stay away from it. Even with the minimal shrinkage you'll encounter from welding stainless nuts are far more likely to gall up on you.

If you have to weld a nut to hold it use black "heavy nuts" if at all possible--the heavier bodies make them easier to weld. And remember, the nut takes the load, the weld just holds it in place and keeps it from turning--no need for heavy welds...
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:39 AM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spencer View Post
I'm looking for tips on welding nuts. I've done this a few times in the past without issue, but it was never for anything critical and I probably just got lucky. I'm going to weld a few nuts tomorrow, so I thought I'd do a search here for some knowledge, but didn't really find any relative topics.

In the past, I've tig welded stainless steel nuts to mild steel. i haven't done it in years, so I don't remember why I chose SS nuts, nor do I remember what filler rod I used. I do remember threading in a bolt, before welding the nuts, to help with distortion, but that is about all I remember.

So, please feel free to chime in with any tips and tricks you have. I'm especially interested to learn if there is any kind of lubricant I should put on the threads before welding. I'd also appreciate a reminder on what filler I should use if I do weld SS nuts to mild steel.

Edit: Is it 309 I want to use for filler? For some reason that is what just popped into my head.
If you are using stainless bolts in your stainless nut you should be applying anti seize lubricant whether you are welding it or not.
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:08 AM
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Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Unless you really need stainless stay away from it. Even with the minimal shrinkage you'll encounter from welding stainless nuts are far more likely to gall up on you.

If you have to weld a nut to hold it use black "heavy nuts" if at all possible--the heavier bodies make them easier to weld. And remember, the nut takes the load, the weld just holds it in place and keeps it from turning--no need for heavy welds...
One thing I have done, is tap drill a hole in a piece of steel,
weld it in place as needed. Then tap the hole after the part
has cooled. Depends a lot on the design.
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:49 AM
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+1 on Shade's idea. I regularly weld nuts on sheets, plates. Drill tap size hole and use the plugs I made. Take a piece of allthread or part of the bolt machine off the thread about 1/16 to tapdrill size. Screw the plug into the nut and clamp it over the tap drilled hole. Weld as necessary. Works anywhere from thin sheets or thicker plates. After the weld drive in the tap through the nut to finish the thing.
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Old 07-29-2017, 10:09 AM
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Like Keith, I also use Heavy Hex nuts that I get at Fastenal. They come plain and unfinished with a light oily coating. I like using these because it gives you a little more thickness on the wall of the nut, and reduces my chances of distorting the threaded area. I have also used the method that Ron described with excellent results.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:51 AM
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moose moose is offline
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Another option is to use cage nuts. They allow you to align the nut as needed the weld is only applied to the cage. If you have room to use them.

https://www.mcmaster.com/#captured-nuts/=18pkqc9

If you need to weld just a nut I prefer to use square nuts only welded on the corners. I find that gives me the least chance of deforming the threads.
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Old 07-29-2017, 05:24 PM
Grizz Grizz is offline
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Grade 2 nuts often come with one size bigger hex, and after you weld a grade 5 you soften it anyway
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Old 07-29-2017, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moose View Post
Another option is to use cage nuts. They allow you to align the nut as needed the weld is only applied to the cage. If you have room to use them.

https://www.mcmaster.com/#captured-nuts/=18pkqc9

If you need to weld just a nut I prefer to use square nuts only welded on the corners. I find that gives me the least chance of deforming the threads.
Those captured nuts look similar to the Threadolets (https://www.google.ca/search?q=threa...CpClvOHSDI4CM:) used for welding on a pipe run for a pipe nipple, plug or whatever else is required.
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