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  #11  
Old 08-04-2017, 10:14 AM
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Big_Eddy Big_Eddy is offline
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Idea 1 - If you're using black pipe, cut the pipe at each transition point, thread the ends, and then screw the 2 pieces together with a coupler. No welding needed, visual and tangible transition indicator, and shouldn't look too ugly.

Idea 2 - given you're painting it. Paint first with standard paint, then run a band or two of masking tape around the pipe at the transition points and coat it with your plasti-dip. Peel off the masking tape and you'll have a tangible change in feel of the finish as your hand follows the rail. Depending on the colours of paint and dip used - you can make the transition visible or invisible.
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  #12  
Old 08-04-2017, 10:20 AM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
Would carriage bolts work
Probably. I could use just the head, strip the zinc off and weld it. Or bore through, and weld on the bottom side (no nut)- I don't want the fastener sticking out, just a smooth bump.
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  #13  
Old 08-04-2017, 10:51 AM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midmosandblasting View Post
I know being a ass. Handrails should be 1 1/2 in dia for American Handicap Act. Set through a program when it 1st came out and disappeared when they told us were were now registered inspectors for it.That way I did not get the ID.
"Shape has a rounded gripping surface shaped from a rectangular stock. Spacing between handrail and the adjacent wall shall be 1-1/2 inches (38 mm). Handrail gripping surface shall be 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 inches diameter (32 - 38 mm)."

From https://www.ada.gov/descript/reg3a/fig39bds.htm

Last edited by Steeveedee; 08-04-2017 at 10:57 AM.
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  #14  
Old 08-04-2017, 10:56 AM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big_Eddy View Post
Idea 1 - If you're using black pipe, cut the pipe at each transition point, thread the ends, and then screw the 2 pieces together with a coupler. No welding needed, visual and tangible transition indicator, and shouldn't look too ugly.

Idea 2 - given you're painting it. Paint first with standard paint, then run a band or two of masking tape around the pipe at the transition points and coat it with your plasti-dip. Peel off the masking tape and you'll have a tangible change in feel of the finish as your hand follows the rail. Depending on the colours of paint and dip used - you can make the transition visible or invisible.
I'm liking the plasti-dip for the whole rail. I discussed that with my wife. It gets really hot here, and I don't anyone to get a burn. The carriage bolt head is the front runner at the moment.

My wife is violently against the couplers. Sure would be a lot easier, but there are some things best left alone.
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  #15  
Old 08-04-2017, 11:27 AM
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http://www.wagnercompanies.com/
Browse thru this web site. They do all types of rails and have fittings, elbows etc.
My building department usually lets us use 1 1/4" structural pipe that is 1 5/8" OD, instead of buying more expensive 1 1/2" OD tube. Plus I have pipe dies if I want to bend the pipe in the Hosfield Bender, do not have tubing dies because haven't invested that $ yet. Or we do miter cut corners a lot to, and just round the seams to make a smooth transition.

We also tend to put Stainless Steel Base plates on the rails nowadays because it seems rust just eats the plates away quickly especially when salt is used in the wintertime to melt ice on the walks. I don't think you will have that problem, but how well does painted metal hold up without rusting in CA?


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  #16  
Old 08-04-2017, 11:58 AM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
http://www.wagnercompanies.com/
Browse thru this web site. They do all types of rails and have fittings, elbows etc.
My building department usually lets us use 1 1/4" structural pipe that is 1 5/8" OD, instead of buying more expensive 1 1/2" OD tube. Plus I have pipe dies if I want to bend the pipe in the Hosfield Bender, do not have tubing dies because haven't invested that $ yet. Or we do miter cut corners a lot to, and just round the seams to make a smooth transition.

We also tend to put Stainless Steel Base plates on the rails nowadays because it seems rust just eats the plates away quickly especially when salt is used in the wintertime to melt ice on the walks. I don't think you will have that problem, but how well does painted metal hold up without rusting in CA?


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It's irrigated desert where I live. The steps have good clear drainage, and we don't use salt, if it ever snows. People stay home if there's 2" of snow on the streets. The first post is at the sidewalk level, but there is never even standing water, there. I could probably get away without painting the thing and have it last ten years.
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  #17  
Old 08-04-2017, 01:37 PM
floydjer floydjer is offline
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How about covering it with truck bed liner? You could probably brush it on....Or call Eastwood and get their spray cans.
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  #18  
Old 08-05-2017, 09:18 AM
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The spray-on plastidip will work, but follow the directions and put it on in a very light coat. One thing you DON'T want to happen is to get it too thick and it start coming loose and slipping while somebody is actually using it to hold themselves up. Give it a good while to cure as well. I used it to paint an area on the front of my car hood after it got bunged up in a wreck with a pig. No surface prep other than a good cleaning (pretty sure I used glass cleaner). Sprayed on in multiple light coats over the course of a couple days. It's still going strong even with lots of trips through the automated car wash. It might develop some small splits/tears over time, but it's easy enough to re-coat. You can choose to completely peel it off or just coat over.

I like the carriage bolt idea too. Simple, effective, and she shouldn't tear her hand on it as long as you blend it down well.
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  #19  
Old 08-05-2017, 01:16 PM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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LOL. Now my wife says NO! to the bumps! I give up.
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  #20  
Old 08-05-2017, 02:24 PM
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Just run about 3 weld beads around the pipe about a foot before the step on either side.smooth them out a little with a flap wheel.
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