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Old 11-13-2017, 09:35 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
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Default shop layout and floor jig ideas?

So I'm planning on pouring a concrete slab in my pole barn next year and am looking for some ideas on putting something useful actually in the slab.

While I'm at it, I'll show you the current setup, and what I'm hoping to do in the future.

My pole barn currently is 40' wide and 63' long with 16' sidewalls. In this image, you can see the current floorplan on the LEFT. The three rooms (Office, CNC room, and Tool room) have a concrete floor while the rest of the barn right now is a dirt floor. Above the 3 finished rooms are a loft with a gas furnace that does work, but I got rid of the LP tank a few years ago since I barely go out there in the winter anymore. I don't go out much in the winter because right now, my shop area is in the dirt floor and I hate it!

My ideal future plans are to "someday" add a 12' wide by 32' long lean-to on the side of the barn, like on the RIGHT floorplan pictured, then pour a big slab, and make 2 more big rooms... the shop, and the paint booth. I will also then continue the ceiling joists and make the entire area above for storage. I have an insane amount of those gray, industrial, adjustable shelving units that I'll fill the entire loft with, and organize all of my smaller "stuff" up there. Larger items like vehicles, lawnmovers ATV's, etc... will stay on the right side of the barn in the gravel storage area.

Im not sure if or when I'll ever get to add on to the barn though, but I really need more cement floor space, so my plan next year is to just pour enough concrete for a shop like in the MIDDLE floorplan pictured. I can then frame it in, put in ceiling joists, and still have my loft space above. The work I'll be doing out there is mostly metalworking. I'll be making artsy stuff with my CNC plasma cutting table, I'll also be doing some blacksmithing. Mostly smaller stuff like craft show items, but I used to occasionally do larger work like railings and structural ornamental ironwork, and I may get back into the larger items as well. That's why I planned on a dedicated area for painting.
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Last edited by Scratch; 11-13-2017 at 09:42 PM.
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Old 11-13-2017, 09:36 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
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So that's the story on the layout of my barn, but what I'm really asking for ideas are on what to put in the concrete floor. I already have a few ideas on what I'd like to put in the floor:

1. PEX tubing for in floor heat. I have an outdoor wood burner that heats my house concrete and I want to at least have the possibility of heating the shop floor with it as well.

2. In floor jig. This will be made out of 4" wide I-Beams that I already have. I'm thinking maybe making it exactly 3' wide and at least 6' maybe even 8' long. It will be flush with the floor so it'll be easy to roll a jack or anything over it without causing problems. It will all be welded together as one piece, and will have a piece of rebar or something going under the concrete over to the side of the wall, where I can connect a ground to it for welding. It'll have 2" receiver tubing pockets welded to it, so I can drop in fixtures that I don't want to twist like my compact bender, manual tire changer, and any other future tools I may think of. To use those pockets, all I need to do is make bases that will drop into the floor fixture, then attach the tool onto that. It'll also have 1/2" holes drilled into it with nuts welded to the backside for screwing things down to it. I'm also open to other ideas for this jig by the way...
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Old 11-13-2017, 09:37 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
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3. Floor drain? I'm not entirely sure I want this since I want a perfectly level floor by the "In Floor Jig" for fabricating, but I think it would be nice to have for washing things like vehicles, ATV's etc... I could pour the big slab in two parts, the first half for the shop being perfectly flat, and then pour the second half with a slope for a drain where the paint booth would go. The big problem with that would be if I did the addition. Since the addition isn't done, the drain wouldn't be in the correct location once I add the addition. Not sure what to do about that...

Any other ideas or input?
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Old 11-13-2017, 10:05 PM
bigb bigb is offline
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The only thing I regret is not putting a pit in my garage. With angle iron edges that plates could sit on flush with the floor when not in use.
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Old 11-13-2017, 11:22 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigb View Post
The only thing I regret is not putting a pit in my garage. With angle iron edges that plates could sit on flush with the floor when not in use.
Good idea... hadn't thought of that. That's EXACTLY the kind of ideas I'm looking for!
Keep the ideas coming!

Last edited by Scratch; 11-14-2017 at 07:49 AM.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:57 AM
baldy347 baldy347 is offline
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Hot water lines embedded in the floor [under it?] makes it much nicer when you need to work directly on the floor.

You DO need a circulating pump , and backup if you have a power failure.


A friend didn't - "cause it can't freeze if there is a fire in the stove" . Stove and coils were about 4 feet above the buried lines...

It would be a constant 80 deg. on the floor before the pipes burst; even at -20 deg. outside.

Now he uses propane fired forced air.

Still not a bad place to work, but was much nicer before.

wayne
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Old 11-14-2017, 09:24 AM
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toprecycler toprecycler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baldy347 View Post
Hot water lines embedded in the floor [under it?] makes it much nicer when you need to work directly on the floor.



You DO need a circulating pump , and backup if you have a power failure.





A friend didn't - "cause it can't freeze if there is a fire in the stove" . Stove and coils were about 4 feet above the buried lines...



It would be a constant 80 deg. on the floor before the pipes burst; even at -20 deg. outside.



Now he uses propane fired forced air.



Still not a bad place to work, but was much nicer before.



wayne


I always believed moving water will not freeze in my system so my pump circulates continuous. But I try not to let the fire go out either. Have thought about having the pump on a battery backup, but just haven’t got a roundtoit yet.


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Old 11-14-2017, 10:11 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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I have given a great deal of thought about installing some type of steel structure in a concrete floor for the purpose of fixturing. I decided to build an above ground mobile fixture that is easily packaged and moved.

If I were to install something in concrete it would simply be an array of individual 1/2" thick plates perhaps 4"x4" square with 1/2-13 threaded holes spaced 2.5" apart set flush with the surface. I would place these in an area with an overhead crane to give good flexibility for various projects.

The 2.5" hole spacing is a standard in my shop. It is dictated by the distance between the T-slots on my milling machine table. All of my fabrication tables have this same pitch so all fixtures can be used anywhere, even on the rear bumper of my service truck.

The plates would be located with a standard spacing in both X and Y direction so that I could easily build off of them as I wish.

I would not install a drain if I were to build another shop. I did so with my current shop and I have regretted ever since. I simply never use it as I thought I would and it regularly causes interference. If I need to wash something it goes outside where there is no chance of adding moisture to the inside. I have a very heavy tool cart with wheels that have low rolling resistance, I have great difficulty navigating around my drain.
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Old 11-14-2017, 09:53 PM
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I built some receiver tubes with a plate on the face with some tapped bolt holes. I use these to mount tools, stands, rollers, etc in. My tire machine has a 2" stub on it and just drops into the receiver, but if I want a more rigid post I just add a flange and bolt it down. Very handy, though you might just wait and core them after the pour.
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Old 11-14-2017, 10:15 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post

I always believed moving water will not freeze in my system so my pump circulates continuous. But I try not to let the fire go out either. Have thought about having the pump on a battery backup, but just haven’t got a roundtoit yet.

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Here ya go bud...
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