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Old 08-29-2017, 06:52 AM
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OZWELDER OZWELDER is offline
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Default Strategies to cope with the shakes

STRATEGIES TO MINIMISE EFFECTS OF
THE WELDORS SHAKES

WORKING CENTRAL TO YOUR BODY
WORK ZONE ,TOOLS AND CONSUMABLES IN CENTRAL BODY ZONE


For the welding operator this covers positioning of body relative to the position of where the welding is being performed. Best outcomes will be achieved when this welding zone is central to the operators reach and is within his range of comfort.
We are talking about practice for vertical up welding but some of the techniques discussed further on can lend themselves to other positions.

When possible sit over standing. Irrespective of sitting or standing the work zone is still aligned central to your body . You also need to be close in to the work.

ARMS CLOSER TO BODY

Reach plays an important part in stabilizing movement your electrode.
As an example, take a lump hammer and hold it at arms length out from your body. Compare it with holding the same hammer closer to your body. It is much easier to keep that same weight closer to the body and so it is with the electrode holder, which is what what you blokes call the stinger. The stinger cable should be flexible with a bunch of fine core wires in the core.

Flexibility of the stinger side cable can be important when angle and position adjustments must be made during the weld.

YOU NEED TO SEE CLEARLY TO MANIPULATE THE ARC
Now being an old fart myself vision can be a problem. Vision and in particular finding your own personal focal length can be a problem. Among other problems I am a diabetic and that means regular script changes. I find weld shield lens diopters real handy to maintain sharp vision. They are found at welding supply shops. Cheap reading glasses are also an option.

SUPPORT THE WEIGHT OF THE ELECTRODE CABLE
If you have to continually support the weight of the cable you will fatigue sooner and again the visual appearance of the weld suffers. I have draped the cable around my shoulders but only after a check for cable electrical integrity and only while wearing a jacket.
If you would rather not do this, the safer alternative is to fab up a bench hook to hold the majority of the cable weight so you are left only supporting just enough cable length to manipulate the stinger.

CONTROL THAT ELECTRODE USING ONE FINGER
Some welding operators steady the electrode by supporting it across the index finger of the supporting hand. Yes, the technique means more exposure of that hand closer to the arc.

SUPPORT ELECTRODE USING AN OVERGLOVE ON SUPPORT HAND

This discomfort is minimized by use of an ”over glove” cut from an old leather gauntlet. Be sure to remove the gauntlet liner as it almost certain to smolder.
It goes a long way to keep the supporting finger/hand comfortable.
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  #2  
Old 08-29-2017, 07:33 AM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OZWELDER View Post
STRATEGIES TO MINIMISE EFFECTS OF
THE WELDORS SHAKES

WORKING CENTRAL TO YOUR BODY
WORK ZONE ,TOOLS AND CONSUMABLES IN CENTRAL BODY ZONE


For the welding operator this covers positioning of body relative to the position of where the welding is being performed. Best outcomes will be achieved when this welding zone is central to the operators reach and is within his range of comfort.
We are talking about practice for vertical up welding but some of the techniques discussed further on can lend themselves to other positions.

When possible sit over standing. Irrespective of sitting or standing the work zone is still aligned central to your body . You also need to be close in to the work.

ARMS CLOSER TO BODY

Reach plays an important part in stabilizing movement your electrode.
As an example, take a lump hammer and hold it at arms length out from your body. Compare it with holding the same hammer closer to your body. It is much easier to keep that same weight closer to the body and so it is with the electrode holder, which is what what you blokes call the stinger. The stinger cable should be flexible with a bunch of fine core wires in the core.

Flexibility of the stinger side cable can be important when angle and position adjustments must be made during the weld.

YOU NEED TO SEE CLEARLY TO MANIPULATE THE ARC
Now being an old fart myself vision can be a problem. Vision and in particular finding your own personal focal length can be a problem. Among other problems I am a diabetic and that means regular script changes. I find weld shield lens diopters real handy to maintain sharp vision. They are found at welding supply shops. Cheap reading glasses are also an option.

SUPPORT THE WEIGHT OF THE ELECTRODE CABLE
If you have to continually support the weight of the cable you will fatigue sooner and again the visual appearance of the weld suffers. I have draped the cable around my shoulders but only after a check for cable electrical integrity and only while wearing a jacket.
If you would rather not do this, the safer alternative is to fab up a bench hook to hold the majority of the cable weight so you are left only supporting just enough cable length to manipulate the stinger.

CONTROL THAT ELECTRODE USING ONE FINGER
Some welding operators steady the electrode by supporting it across the index finger of the supporting hand. Yes, the technique means more exposure of that hand closer to the arc.

SUPPORT ELECTRODE USING AN OVERGLOVE ON SUPPORT HAND

This discomfort is minimized by use of an ”over glove” cut from an old leather gauntlet. Be sure to remove the gauntlet liner as it almost certain to smolder.
It goes a long way to keep the supporting finger/hand comfortable.
"Arms closer to the body"....I have noticed I shake when I have to "reach" as the electrode becomes shorter when I vertical up.

With the cable, I have been wrapping it over my shoulders to take some of the weight off, but with that said, sometimes I don't go that route because at times the shakes seem to stop when there is some weight there. Weighted spoons and even spoons with gyros have been made to help people with tremors to keep them from making food fly off the spoon.

One does need to see the puddle clearly to be able to lay down a bead. I myself wear bi-focals, but a lot of times it seems that I see better when I take them off to see at close range because I can't see a thing wearing them up close.

In closing....I would like to say that the welding operator has to find his/her comfort zone.

Thanks
Tim
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  #3  
Old 08-29-2017, 09:24 AM
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"



In closing....I would like to say that the welding operator has to find his/her comfort zone.



Thanks

Tim


I think you said it all here Tim. It is whatever that makes you feel the most comfortable in the given position that you find yourself in. There is no one way that will work for everyone. The most important thing is your attitude. I applaud you for your continued tenacity in asking questions trying to improve your welding. Having an open mind to try new ideas that others might have is important.

I have a younger coworker at work trying to learn the trade now. At first I tried to be super helpful with suggestions to improve himself, but now I am reluctant to suggest as much since I sense "an attitude " from him when giving suggestions, or giving him directions on how I want something done. He thinks he knows best sometimes, so I let him learn on his own then. Sometimes you do need to humble yourself to learn.

I was listening to one of Jody's (welding tips n tricks) pod casts and he said (and the recruiter for a shipyard that he was interviewing) that having the right attitude can be the most important thing that an employer is looking for to.

Anyways, keep practicing, and you will find the best method that works for you!


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  #4  
Old 08-29-2017, 10:17 AM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
I think you said it all here Tim. It is whatever that makes you feel the most comfortable in the given position that you find yourself in. There is no one way that will work for everyone. The most important thing is your attitude. I applaud you for your continued tenacity in asking questions trying to improve your welding. Having an open mind to try new ideas that others might have is important.

I have a younger coworker at work trying to learn the trade now. At first I tried to be super helpful with suggestions to improve himself, but now I am reluctant to suggest as much since I sense "an attitude " from him when giving suggestions, or giving him directions on how I want something done. He thinks he knows best sometimes, so I let him learn on his own then. Sometimes you do need to humble yourself to learn.

I was listening to one of Jody's (welding tips n tricks) pod casts and he said (and the recruiter for a shipyard that he was interviewing) that having the right attitude can be the most important thing that an employer is looking for to.

Anyways, keep practicing, and you will find the best method that works for you!


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Thank you very much for the sentiments. I appreciate it. The attitude of your co-worker would make it very difficult for anyone to work with that individual. I was just thinking. I mentioned in my post, to Oz, that there are waited spoons and even spoons with gyros built in so people wont shake their food everywhere. I got to thinking about that. Suppose I weighted down my stinger (such as maybe pour a little concrete into the handle or some how attach a spring to it and go from there)? In the end, it has to be me that overcomes this mess. No one can do it for me. I have to find a way to overcome these tremors. Why should I let them hinder me from doing something that I enjoy immensely? People all over the world overcome disabilities everyday and now, it's time that I do so.

Thanks
Tim
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  #5  
Old 08-29-2017, 10:51 AM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OZWELDER View Post
STRATEGIES TO MINIMISE EFFECTS OF
THE WELDORS SHAKES

WORKING CENTRAL TO YOUR BODY
WORK ZONE ,TOOLS AND CONSUMABLES IN CENTRAL BODY ZONE


For the welding operator this covers positioning of body relative to the position of where the welding is being performed. Best outcomes will be achieved when this welding zone is central to the operators reach and is within his range of comfort.
We are talking about practice for vertical up welding but some of the techniques discussed further on can lend themselves to other positions.

When possible sit over standing. Irrespective of sitting or standing the work zone is still aligned central to your body . You also need to be close in to the work.

ARMS CLOSER TO BODY

Reach plays an important part in stabilizing movement your electrode.
As an example, take a lump hammer and hold it at arms length out from your body. Compare it with holding the same hammer closer to your body. It is much easier to keep that same weight closer to the body and so it is with the electrode holder, which is what what you blokes call the stinger. The stinger cable should be flexible with a bunch of fine core wires in the core.

Flexibility of the stinger side cable can be important when angle and position adjustments must be made during the weld.

YOU NEED TO SEE CLEARLY TO MANIPULATE THE ARC
Now being an old fart myself vision can be a problem. Vision and in particular finding your own personal focal length can be a problem. Among other problems I am a diabetic and that means regular script changes. I find weld shield lens diopters real handy to maintain sharp vision. They are found at welding supply shops. Cheap reading glasses are also an option.

SUPPORT THE WEIGHT OF THE ELECTRODE CABLE
If you have to continually support the weight of the cable you will fatigue sooner and again the visual appearance of the weld suffers. I have draped the cable around my shoulders but only after a check for cable electrical integrity and only while wearing a jacket.
If you would rather not do this, the safer alternative is to fab up a bench hook to hold the majority of the cable weight so you are left only supporting just enough cable length to manipulate the stinger.

CONTROL THAT ELECTRODE USING ONE FINGER
Some welding operators steady the electrode by supporting it across the index finger of the supporting hand. Yes, the technique means more exposure of that hand closer to the arc.

SUPPORT ELECTRODE USING AN OVERGLOVE ON SUPPORT HAND

This discomfort is minimized by use of an ”over glove” cut from an old leather gauntlet. Be sure to remove the gauntlet liner as it almost certain to smolder.
It goes a long way to keep the supporting finger/hand comfortable.

Oz:
I have a quick question that I hope you can help me with....Here in North America, when water goes down the drain it goes in a clockwise direction and in Australia it goes in a counter clockwise direction. Here is North America, a tornado goes in a counter clockwise direction and in Australia, a tornado goes in a clockwise direction. Now, with all that said, here in North America, we weld with electrode positive for greater penetration and electrode negative for lesser penetration. In Australia, do you weld with electrode positive for lesser penetration and electrode negative for greater penetration? I just had to ask

Thanks
Tim
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  #6  
Old 08-29-2017, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
Oz:
I have a quick question that I hope you can help me with....Here in North America, when water goes down the drain it goes in a clockwise direction and in Australia it goes in a counter clockwise direction. Here is North America, a tornado goes in a counter clockwise direction and in Australia, a tornado goes in a clockwise direction. Now, with all that said, here in North America, we weld with electrode positive for greater penetration and electrode negative for lesser penetration. In Australia, do you weld with electrode positive for lesser penetration and electrode negative for greater penetration? I just had to ask

Thanks
Tim
I believe they call them cyclones down under...
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  #7  
Old 08-29-2017, 11:51 AM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Originally Posted by weldor2005 View Post
I believe they call them cyclones down under...
Your right. Please forgive me for my stupidity and my carelessness of thought. EDIT...Sometimes I forget to think.

Tim
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Last edited by Rufus; 08-29-2017 at 12:29 PM. Reason: Add a line. Thanks
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  #8  
Old 08-29-2017, 01:47 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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I apologize for the corny joke I made above. I was trying to make people on here happy

Thanks
Tim
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  #9  
Old 08-29-2017, 05:26 PM
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A shot of whiskey or your favorite spirit helps with the shakes also. I have a bottle of wild turkey 101 for soldering circuit boards.
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  #10  
Old 08-29-2017, 06:11 PM
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When I was welding for a living, My lifestyle would occasionally lead to a buzzy head, severe tremors and extreme sensitivity to light, right about the time I showed up for work.

When I was "on the roof", 7018 vertical up was a breeze with about 70 OPM natural. (oscillations per minuet) On that particular job, the lead man referred to me as "buzzy" (imagine that)

I found that ear plugs, sun glasses, 2 boilermakers on the way in, and wrapping the stinger lead 3 times around my stinger hand would quiet the "natural oscillation" to the point I could work.

Cause and effect.

RED
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