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Old 03-10-2017, 03:25 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Default Bending metal without oxy/acetylene torch

Hi all:
Once again I have to say "I don't know if this is correct place to post this, so if it isn't please forgive me". I saw a fellow on Youtube (kevin caron an artist) in a video showing how to cut slits in metal with a 4 and a half inch angle grinder then bending it around to the shape you want it to form. In the following pictures I show 1) the slits made and the metal bent, 2) slits welded up (can you say pelican droppings?) 3) welds ground down and a shot of the finished product from the top and 4) shot of the finished product from the side. The welds were laid with 1/8 inch 6013 on 85 Amps DC+. If I were to attempt this again, I would try a 3/32 inch rod.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 03-10-2017, 03:37 PM
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The material you chose for this project would not appear to require the technique that you are demonstrating, as it is thin enough to just bend with a vise and a pair of pins.

Or am I missing something here?
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Old 03-10-2017, 03:46 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rock6.3 View Post
The material you chose for this project would not appear to require the technique that you are demonstrating, as it is thin enough to just bend with a vise and a pair of pins.

Or am I missing something here?

You're not missing anything. It's just something I wanted to try my hand at. It looked interesting to try. I could have heated it up with my small propane torch but I wanted to cut the slits, bend the metal then weld it all up and of course, grind it smooth.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 03-10-2017, 06:40 PM
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Ii have used that technique in the past. The last shop I worked at had a 8foot break and a wide selection of dies.

If specs called for a certain material and a specific bend radius and the machine wasn't capable of doing that, you have to cut slits in it just like you show.

If you cut half of the length of the bend you are decreasing the force needed by half. I am assuming that to be correct, I never tried to actually calc out the forces involved. If someone knows different, I would like to know. ..
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Old 03-10-2017, 07:11 PM
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The forces are not totally linear based on thickness .
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Old 03-10-2017, 07:37 PM
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I can understand using this method on maybe something that is 3/16 inch thick or greater. The only problem I had was welding the slits together, but maybe that could have been over come by using more of them hence not leaving such wide gaps that I had shown here.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:13 PM
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I would prefer to fire up my welder once, and use it to construct a proper
bending brake.
Their have been a couple of fine examples shown on this forum.
Here is the latest:
http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/...ad.php?t=47651

And then my bends will be made simple, fast, and don't have all that weld on them.
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:24 PM
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For something like that, you would have been time ahead to just lay it on the ground and hit it with a hammer, moved it a quarter inch, then hit it again. Continue moving a 1/4 and hitting it till required results are made.

I know you wanted to try it just to see how its done, I've done it to investigate too. I've also done the hammer thing. its fun to look into all the different ways you can do something to get to the same finish(imho).
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:34 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
I would prefer to fire up my welder once, and use it to construct a proper
bending brake.
Their have been a couple of fine examples shown on this forum.
Here is the latest:
http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/...ad.php?t=47651

And then my bends will be made simple, fast, and don't have all that weld on them.
I would like to make one, however I don't have the room for one and my work bench would wobble to much if I had one mounted to it. You should see my bench move back and forth when I put a piece of steel in my vice and slam it with a blacksmith hammer

Thanks
Tim
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimpyrobb View Post
For something like that, you would have been time ahead to just lay it on the ground and hit it with a hammer, moved it a quarter inch, then hit it again. Continue moving a 1/4 and hitting it till required results are made.

I know you wanted to try it just to see how its done, I've done it to investigate too. I've also done the hammer thing. its fun to look into all the different ways you can do something to get to the same finish(imho).
It really was fun for me to try it. I might try it again Since the metal was so thin in my case, I just used a pair of pliers to make the bends. Thicker steel would require a hammer. More slits spaced closer together and like you said, hit it with a hammer, move a quarter of an inch and repeat.

Thanks
Tim
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