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Old 07-16-2017, 03:55 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Default Storage of rods

Hi all:
UHG! I know this subject has been beaten to death with a dead horse, but I was wondering...a product called "damprid" is used to keep moisture and mold out of the air. I did some research on damprid and I found it is calcium cholride and if that is the case can I store my 7018 rods in a container with nothing more than a lot of salt which is calcium cholride? It just seems reasonable to me that I can use common salt to keep the moisture out of my rods.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 07-16-2017, 04:07 PM
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Not positive but, I think salt is sodium chloride.
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Old 07-16-2017, 04:27 PM
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Not positive but, I think salt is sodium chloride.
I believe you to be right. I did some research and salt is sodium chloride. Calcium chloride is rock salt. I suppose rock salt would work, if pounded down to powder.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 07-16-2017, 04:52 PM
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I just stash my rods in ammo boxes which are gasketed.

No issues even in humid SC.

Warm 7018 runs better so you might toss your rods in an old toaster oven before use. There's no functional reason you couldn't wrap them in foil and throw 'em on the grill like an ear of corn.
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Old 07-16-2017, 05:04 PM
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Most rock salt, like solar salt, is sodium chloride (NaCl).

Neither one is a strong enough desiccant to keep 7018 dry enough to meet low-hydrogen specifications, and neither is silica gel – or that is my understanding. The best way to keep 7018 dry is with heat, as far as I know.

There are plans out there where you can make a rod keeper with a couple of light bulbs for heat sources...no need to spend $$$ on a rod keeper...
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Old 07-16-2017, 05:13 PM
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I live in the humid tropics and store my hydrogen controlled electrodes,among others, in capped plastic drain pipes-2" & 4".

In each pipe/tube I have a silica gel capsule/ packet that typically is used to keep my blood pressure medication fresh.

I have electrodes almost 20 years old I still use from time to time and these are still in good condition.


The other thing that I would point out is that the effects of moisture in low hydrogen electrodes only becomes harmful when high structural load is placed on the weld.

I am talking of pressure pipe, earthmoving applications,agricultural tillage and crane lifting booms and associated structures that are subjected to high working loads.


People use the LH Electrodes in the mistaken belief that they will be "stronger" for garden variety type of welding. In a mild steel parent metal the mild steel parent metal will fail before the LH electrode deposit given that weld deposit is welded by a competent operator.

The group of electrodes that 7018s belong to are primarily aimed at stopping the growth of hydrogen "bubbles" at the weld bead/parent metal interface ( the weld root - while subject to a high working load) in higher tensile steels.

So unless one is into welded heavily loaded weldments using 7018 is often not justified.


I taught and tested welding for pressure vessel welding for many years and used a lot of 7016 and 18s and have performed tensile and root bend tests of test plates so I do have experience in what I am speaking about.


Just because so many people believe and repeat this myth does not make it correct.

Thats my 2 c worth
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Old 07-16-2017, 05:42 PM
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Silica gel and some other desiccants only dry to a certain point. I believe Calcium chloride will do a pretty good job, as will quicklime.

Some of the ingredients in welding rods make pretty good desiccants.
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Old 07-17-2017, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OZWELDER View Post
I live in the humid tropics and store my hydrogen controlled electrodes,among others, in capped plastic drain pipes-2" & 4".

In each pipe/tube I have a silica gel capsule/ packet that typically is used to keep my blood pressure medication fresh.

I have electrodes almost 20 years old I still use from time to time and these are still in good condition.


The other thing that I would point out is that the effects of moisture in low hydrogen electrodes only becomes harmful when high structural load is placed on the weld.

I am talking of pressure pipe, earthmoving applications,agricultural tillage and crane lifting booms and associated structures that are subjected to high working loads.


People use the LH Electrodes in the mistaken belief that they will be "stronger" for garden variety type of welding. In a mild steel parent metal the mild steel parent metal will fail before the LH electrode deposit given that weld deposit is welded by a competent operator.

The group of electrodes that 7018s belong to are primarily aimed at stopping the growth of hydrogen "bubbles" at the weld bead/parent metal interface ( the weld root - while subject to a high working load) in higher tensile steels.

So unless one is into welded heavily loaded weldments using 7018 is often not justified.


I taught and tested welding for pressure vessel welding for many years and used a lot of 7016 and 18s and have performed tensile and root bend tests of test plates so I do have experience in what I am speaking about.


Just because so many people believe and repeat this myth does not make it correct.

Thats my 2 c worth
I do appreciate your 2 cents. I have been keeping my 7018 rods under my bed because the humidity rarely gets above what? 40% in my bedroom? In the garage, such as right now, the humidity is about 76%. I like (for garden variety welding as you put it) using 6013 rods for almost everything. I have heard, for the most part, that 7018 is easier to learn to weld with, but I have always found for me that 6013 has been easier. If and when I learn how to weld in a proficient way (where I can weld projects that I base life and limb on them) then I will weld my projects with 7018 rods. For the time being, being a home hobby welder, I can't weld anything that depends upon life or limb.

Thank you
Tim
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Old 07-17-2017, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
For the time being, being a home hobby welder, I can't weld anything that depends upon life or limb.

Thank you
Tim
What welder are you using?
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Old 07-17-2017, 04:50 PM
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What welder are you using?
I use either the Lincoln Tombstone AC 225/DC 125 or the Miller Thunderbolt XL AC 225.

Thanks
Tim
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