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  #21  
Old 05-31-2017, 10:11 PM
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SmokinDodge SmokinDodge is offline
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Lodge has got a hibachi that I have drooled over for years. It's cast iron and I'd like to think it'd last 100 years.

There's multiple wood burning devices around here. The cheapest and pretty frequently used is the bottom of an old freon can cut down and fitted with some 1/4 rod. A bit of lump charcoal and you can fry fish or fry up some fajitas in short order. If the repurposed freon can isn't hillbilly enough I usually stack it on my Weber to get it to a comfortable height and keep the kids from knocking into it.

Cooking over wood is easy. Making edible food over wood is tough.
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  #22  
Old 05-31-2017, 10:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
what's that stuff your stir frying? that looks great. will check out the weber grills. but looking at your pics I might just make something so that I can use it for stir frying outdoors also. Thanks for the pics.
That's breakfast. Country cured bacon and chunk hash browns. There was also scrambled eggs cooked right after the pic was taken.

Brian's got pretty good pics of the rest of the equipment. Do you have the capability to weld? If you do Go to a local farm style store and buy a single disc blade. Fill the center hole with weld or mild steel and season the whole thing just like cast iron. You can set the disc blade or "discata" direct on some coals and cook some amazing food. It doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg.
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  #23  
Old 06-01-2017, 02:06 PM
Oscar Oscar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverback View Post
Oh, FWIW, very few people cook on actual wood.

They usually either cook on charcoal and add a few small chunks of wood (lots of similar ways to do that including the basket full of wood chips that just get warm and don't burn) to add some smoke flavor or they start a wood fire and let it burn down to coals before they cook on them.
That's exactly what cooking on wood around here. 100% Mesquite burned down to coals and then throw the meat on there. "Cooking on wood" doesnt necessarily mean cooking while the firewood is still burning with an open flame. Even letting it burn down to coals is still cooking with wood, because you started with wood in the first place.
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  #24  
Old 06-01-2017, 07:54 PM
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guess I need to learn a lot more about cooking over wood. so if you're using a pan to cook stuff in, you're cooking over coals and not an open flame? I've got a small wok that I can use out doors.
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  #25  
Old 06-01-2017, 09:12 PM
Oscar Oscar is offline
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It all depends how much smoke flavor you want. If you cook while the wood is still burning down, you get a very smoky flavor and depending on the actual wood you use, it could be ok (with mild woods) to wayy too pungent (with strong woods). By trying out many different meats, poultry, and fish, ive learned which food goes good with what level of wood flavor.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psbvwmqgyb.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psp10ylyx2.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psrsqwof1y.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psq6ikizg4.jpg

Brisket so tender, you cannot pick up a slice without it starting to pull apart under its own weight

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...ps642a0c27.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...9/100_6887.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...9/100_6884.jpg


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  #26  
Old 06-01-2017, 10:15 PM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
Hello all, what type of metal to use for making a habachi. Can I use plate steel, stainless, etc. ? I'm planning on making a small habachi so that I can use wood for grilling. I have a gas grill, but would like to try wood and see if there is any difference in taste. I've seen wood chips at Hdepot which appears to be flavored with apple. if anyone has any suggestions please feel free to share. Thanks
I can't remember what makes a cooker a "hibachi" but I cook with straight wood (no charcoal or fuel besides wood) almost exclusively when I am cooking out. I use the small and medium sticks that fall from trees in my yard for the Weber grill and use both sticks and logs in my reverse flow cookers. I actually had a bunch of dead branches break off this winter and once the snow melted I pulled a reverse flow smoker over to the brush pile where it fell. I filled the firebox with all the small sticks and twigs and the smoker was up to temp in 8 minutes because those sticks and twigs burn fast and hot. While I was waiting on the sticks to burn down, I cut the wider sections of the branches into logs with a chainsaw. As room cleared in the firebox I began putting in logs. Once the smoke started to come out of the stack almost looking clear I filled the cook racks with meat. Then I just added wood every 45 minutes or so until several hours passed and the meat was ready. By the end I only had a few logs left and a week and a half worth of smoked meat ready to be eaten. It is the best way to get rid of yard waste that I have come up with so far.
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  #27  
Old 06-01-2017, 11:00 PM
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If you are going to cook directly on the fire like grilling burgers or something like that then you want to make sure you use a hardwood and have a fire that is mostly coals. If you try to cook directly over pine that hasn't burned down yet your burgers will taste like creosote.

If you want to use a skillet or wok or whatever over a fire then it doesn't really matter what kind of wood. I still prefer to have a fire that has a good bed of coals because it is easier to regulate heat.

If you want to use a dutch oven or anything like that, then hardwoods work better because they make better coals. Pine tends to make more ash than coals and can be hard to work with.

If you are in a hurry and don't want to wait on a hardwood fire to burn down to a bed of coals, then buy some hardwood lump charcoal and you'll be cooking within 15 minutes.

If you want a welding project I would look at making a rocket stove. I haven't tried one but they look like fun. Weldingtipsandtricks has a video on youtube about them.
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  #28  
Old 06-02-2017, 09:03 AM
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Thanks for all the advice. will have to try this out.
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  #29  
Old 06-03-2017, 06:36 AM
baldy347 baldy347 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
It all depends how much smoke flavor you want. If you cook while the wood is still burning down, you get a very smoky flavor and depending on the actual wood you use, it could be ok (with mild woods) to wayy too pungent (with strong woods). By trying out many different meats, poultry, and fish, ive learned which food goes good with what level of wood flavor.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psbvwmqgyb.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psp10ylyx2.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psrsqwof1y.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...psq6ikizg4.jpg

Brisket so tender, you cannot pick up a slice without it starting to pull apart under its own weight

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...ps642a0c27.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...9/100_6887.jpg

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...9/100_6884.jpg


I can't see these pics... and I ain't chasing 'em!

wayne
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  #30  
Old 06-03-2017, 11:11 AM
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SmokinDodge SmokinDodge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oscar View Post
It all depends how much smoke flavor you want. If you cook while the wood is still burning down, you get a very smoky flavor and depending on the actual wood you use, it could be ok (with mild woods) to wayy too pungent (with strong woods). By trying out many different meats, poultry, and fish, ive learned which food goes good with what level of wood flavor.



Oscar I'm sure your food looks great but I'll never know. I'm not about to click each one of those and get bombed by popups ads and what not. A pretty simple way of handling pictures is to simply upload them to the site, that way in a year or two when you clean out photobucket the pics are still here and the thread is still relevant. Theres a billion write ups on how to do pics around here so I won't bore everyone again.
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