Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Blacksmithing & Forming

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-26-2017, 11:10 AM
biker55's Avatar
biker55 biker55 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: orange county ny
Posts: 136
Default fractures in metal

hello all, was re heating a fire striker to reconfigure it. after I had quenched it, I noticed that there were small hairline fractures on one side of the metal. any ideas as to what would cause this? the first time forging I didn't see any fractures. thanks
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-26-2017, 12:10 PM
Walker's Avatar
Walker Walker is offline
Standard of Excellence
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cave Creek AZ
Posts: 3,982
Default

Usually caused by overheat. Scrap it and start again.
__________________
Walker
Chief slag chipper and floor sweeper, Ironwood Artistic
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-26-2017, 12:41 PM
USMCPOP's Avatar
USMCPOP USMCPOP is offline
Gold Star Dad
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Richmond, VA area
Posts: 11,437
Default

Overheat or too severe a quench (too cold or using water for an oil quench steel). Also forging at too low a temperature can cause problems. Sometimes reheating a hardened object too quickly can cause problems due to thermal stress.
__________________
USMCPOP
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-26-2017, 12:45 PM
biker55's Avatar
biker55 biker55 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: orange county ny
Posts: 136
Default

Thanks. got another question. have been using my channel lock pliers to hold the stock while pounding. a few times it slipped out. so now I'm in the market to buy a blacksmith tong. which one should I get and what size. I saw on one site they had 1/4 and 1/2 and the lengths varied from 12 inch to longer. plus, I saw flat tongs, wolf tongs, and tongs with v notches. which one would be the most versatile. I'm just a hobbyist. Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-26-2017, 12:50 PM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is online now
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

Jennifer had some videos of forging some tongs. I always liked the idea of making your own tools.

As far as to what size, I guess it would depend on what material you work with mostly, and what you make. Maybe a set with some v-notches if you work with round stock, of course you could always file some notches in some flat ones to help hold the round stock.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-26-2017, 01:04 PM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is online now
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

"How to make Chain Makers Tongs"

http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/...ad.php?t=47687

This should take you to Jennifer’s chain making tong video post.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-26-2017, 02:25 PM
milomilo's Avatar
milomilo milomilo is online now
Auction Addict
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wheatland, Wyoming
Posts: 12,109
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
Thanks. got another question. have been using my channel lock pliers to hold the stock while pounding. a few times it slipped out. so now I'm in the market to buy a blacksmith tong. which one should I get and what size. I saw on one site they had 1/4 and 1/2 and the lengths varied from 12 inch to longer. plus, I saw flat tongs, wolf tongs, and tongs with v notches. which one would be the most versatile. I'm just a hobbyist. Thanks
You will need more than one style. The flat jaws, the diamond style and the ones with round jaws. Each one is for steel that fits in each one. I have collected at least 20 pair so far and I still have not built the forge yet.
__________________
Chris

“In order to become the master, the politician poses as the servant.” Charles de Gaulle
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-26-2017, 02:54 PM
Bender's Avatar
Bender Bender is online now
One Lone Sub
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Nampa, ID
Posts: 4,932
Default

Where is Miss Jennifer?
__________________
Boise Paint Contractor
Facebook
How fortunate we are!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-26-2017, 03:02 PM
biker55's Avatar
biker55 biker55 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: orange county ny
Posts: 136
Default

great video, unfortunately I'm not at the stage where I can make a functioning tong. tried it using some rebar I had. spent a couple of days trying to get the jaws to match up, and decided to throw in the towel and buy the tongs.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-26-2017, 04:00 PM
Matt Shade's Avatar
Matt Shade Matt Shade is online now
Made From Scratch
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,344
Default

The flat tongs would get you by to start, since you appear to be working with flat bar mostly. The sizes listed are the thickness of stock they are meant to hold. 1/2 for example, has a jaw opening of 1/2 inch when the handles are pinched together, so you wouldn't be able to pick up 5/16 with them. 1/4 inch tongs will pick up thin stuff and if you tweak the handles a little you could maybe even get by working with 3/8".

Eventually you will want more than one type. V bit tongs are good for square bar but won't be much use on flat bar. Pickup tongs might be good for making a hammer head or something large but won't be of much use for smaller stock.

For me, I like the length (reins) to be 12" to 14". That gets your hand back out of the heat, but isn't so long that the tongs are heavy and clumsy to use.

Here is a good selection of tongs to give you an idea of what's out there:
http://www.centaurforge.com/Tongs/departments/102/

I have made some very crude tongs and gotten by for a long time but I broke down and bought a pair of diamond brand 5/16 hot tongs off the farrier supply trailer at the last big horse show we were at and I have really liked how they are working out. I think now that I have a good pair in hand, I will have a better shot at making my own. Easier to copy something when you have it in hand.

Be careful buying tongs off ebay or craigslist of anything like that. I have seen a lot of pull offs and nippers (tools farriers use to trim horses feet) listed as blacksmithing tongs online. They won't help you at all unless you forge the ends into something useful. Make sure you know what style you are getting.
__________________
Handcrafted Leather
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.