Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Machining

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 11-28-2017, 03:51 PM
milomilo's Avatar
milomilo milomilo is offline
Auction Addict
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wheatland, Wyoming
Posts: 12,109
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
One thing that sticks in my mind about having the compound setcatv30 degrees is that for every .001 you turn that in, it will cut .0005 or 1/2 in a facing cut. Helps when you need to make a part a certain length and you are able to Mic it or use calipers to determine the length. Although, this lathe I am using has a dial on the carriage hand wheel. I just need to get it cleaned up so I can read it. But I will be making some holders for my disk indicators to mount if I find I need to hold those tight tolerances. From what I was seeing today, it does not appear that I need to be super precise, or they are just being easy on me to start.

I have to learn more about the material. I know it has a chrome coating on the shafts, that they tell me is hard. Some shafts have a thicker coating that they will sometimes uses different inserts for. I have a lot to learn yet.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
That one thing WD-40 is good for, removing old scum on metal.
__________________
Chris

“In order to become the master, the politician poses as the servant.” Charles de Gaulle
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-28-2017, 07:05 PM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

Christmas came early for me. In addition to the new tool post and holders, got a new light, and 6” digital mics.

I had to machine the base plate of the tool post to fit the compound slot though. Asked the shop foreman which way he would like to fix it, and he let me choose. He seemed surprised that I thought I could handle it.

So I got to learn how to run the big CINCINNATI mill. Luckily, the head machinist came over and gave me some pointers. Help speed up the learning process.
2nd pic is the lines I layed out to machine to. Had to take overall width down about 1/2”, and then machine a step of another 1/4” x 1/4” appropriate to fit. Then worked on getting tool bits installed in the holders.

Watched other machinist do a couple jobs, and then actually had to machine one part he just made a little more to make fit for the mechanic putting the cylinder back together, so got to use the new tool post.

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4797.JPG
Views:	97
Size:	154.4 KB
ID:	142332Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4798.JPG
Views:	100
Size:	171.9 KB
ID:	142333Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4801.JPG
Views:	108
Size:	189.2 KB
ID:	142334


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-28-2017, 09:48 PM
cutter's Avatar
cutter cutter is offline
Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Lubbock,Texas
Posts: 31,917
Default

Sounds like you're off to a good start and they were prepared for less.
__________________
cutter
Housekeeping Staff: the Gatekeeper
Director of Policy, Syntax and Grammar (by appointment)

"Dr. Chandran, will I dream?"

I want to go home!
Oh! Come to think of it, I am home.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-07-2017, 06:13 AM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

Couple more insert tool holders came in yesterday. I am finding out that I would like a dozen more holders though. They are nice to just switch out real fast. Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4835.JPG
Views:	62
Size:	160.1 KB
ID:	142449


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-14-2017, 12:32 PM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

Welp. I broke the lathe today. Set up to chase some metric threads in a piston to clean them up, and at the end went to disengage the half nut, and by bad habit in gaged the feed lever instead. Locked up the carriage, and couple seconds later, heard thump thump thump. Was teeth shearing off The idler gear driving the carriage feed gear box. Boss has ordered new part and is in its way. New part is steel I guess. Old one was a fiber gear. I assume for this reason. expensive learning lesson for me. I volunteered to make one out of aluminum, but they passed.Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4863.JPG
Views:	76
Size:	182.1 KB
ID:	142546


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-14-2017, 12:53 PM
Ironman's Avatar
Ironman Ironman is offline
Iron Modification Investigator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Warburg, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 11,678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Welp. I broke the lathe today. Set up to chase some metric threads in a piston to clean them up, and at the end went to disengage the half nut, and by bad habit in gaged the feed lever instead. Locked up the carriage, and couple seconds later, heard thump thump thump. Was teeth shearing off The idler gear driving the carriage feed gear box. Boss has ordered new part and is in its way. New part is steel I guess. Old one was a fiber gear. I assume for this reason. expensive learning lesson for me. I volunteered to make one out of aluminum, but they passed.Attachment 142546


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
I have to say I am surprised at that....not that you did something dumb but that the lathe let you.
Every lathe I have owned, including my present Indian lathe, locks out the carriage lever by using the half nuts. Also every lathe I have used has a shear pin on the acme screw. Some bright bulb may have replaced that with a hardened steel pin, instead of a copper or aluminum pin.
The good thing is it didn't blow up the QC box.
__________________
Gerry
“After all, no one is stupid enough to prefer war to peace; in peace sons bury their fathers, and in war fathers bury their sons.”
Herodotus

Even duct tape can't fix stupid ... But it can muffle the sound. Attributed to Red Green
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-14-2017, 05:09 PM
Norm W's Avatar
Norm W Norm W is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 2,570
Default

That fiber gear may have been there for a reason. A steel gear would not have been as forgiving. Check for shear pins. Ironman could well be on to something.
__________________
Make over, make do, or do without

Why do I have to press one for English when you're just gonna transfer me to someone I can't understand anyway?

Grant me the strength to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can & the friends to post my bail when I finally snap!
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-14-2017, 10:57 PM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Norm W View Post
That fiber gear may have been there for a reason. A steel gear would not have been as forgiving. Check for shear pins. Ironman could well be on to something.


That is what I figure too. Actually I was looking into why it allowed me to engage the carriage feed with the threading half nuts engaged already. I didn’t see anything jump out at me, so I might have to open up the carriage and look inside. One thing I did notice is when I engage the threading half but, the feed screw will lift about a quarter inch. I can see the brass bushing that it rides in is wore out that much. I probably should take it apart and make some new ones.

I don’t know if the fiber gear is no longer available or the boss just ordered the steel one just because. But I was told it will be here tomorrow though. Much better than old boss on getting replacement parts.

I am trying to get this lathe in a little better operating position. It does have some little quirks, but it has been used daily for 20 years, until the shop bought a new summit lathe 2 years ago I think. Then this lathe replaced an older lathe that they ended up scrapping. Until I came, it was only used for spray welding on shafts when needed, or the mechanics would come over and polish seal grooves in pistons and heads with sandpaper.

There was and issue with the power cross feed, but another guy in the shop got that working, but it still has a sticky part at times. The second machinist told me don’t spend too much time fixing “that piece of junk “ because in a year, I will be taking over for the retiring machinist and I will get the new lathe to learn. That one has DRO on the apron and crossslide. Of course, the senior machinist told me today that that is not working properly, and did say that my lathe is actually better than the new one. So who knows what I should believe.

I am happy to be using the one I have though. It seems to be a lot better than the one I had at the old work, just needs some tlc. I have enough stubbornness in me to push the envelope when the other guys are trying to tell me to shortcut some things, but I have to balance who I upset and how bad. I still need to learn a lot from them. The senior machinist seems to be talking/ giving me some helpful advice a little bit more. He is kinda gruff getting used to, and I am surprised that he is not more anal about how things are organized in the shop. I have a lot of potential organizing to do on all the stock racks. He has already tried to stop me from one section, but little does he know, that I am just starting.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12-17-2017, 07:43 AM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 2,729
Default

Gear came in the next day as promised. I managed to get it back together at work the end of the day. I was finishing a job I started the day before. I included a picture of the adjuster and how far it was out. It was fairly tight, so I don’t think it pushed itself out when it sheared the teeth. I will check the rotation Monday morning to verify how it drives. It would make feel a little more to know that it might try to kick itself out if something locks the carriage up again and keep from shearing this gear again, or the next weaker spot.

The boss gave me permission to look into replacing the wore out thread lead bushings. The more I tear into this lathe to fix things, the more I will know and understand it.

While working on the carriage light, I tripped a circuit breaker that fed the power to the coolant pump and the quick feed carriage/ crossfeed motor. Mike (senior machinist who used this machine for 20 years) looked in the electric box, and did not figure it out. Later, I started checking myself tracing wires and checking with a voltage meter, and I finally figured out the circuit breaker switch. First time I seen one like this, so it did not stand right out at me what it was.

Next week I will start trouble shooting why the one mill will shock you when touching the switch box, and table with your other hand. “Been that way for several years, just don’t touch the bed when turning on and off” was the advice I got from coworkers. boss was surprised when I asked him how long it has been going on. The boss/ owner was taught and grew up in this business. He has done most every job here, and now has built it big enough with enough guys that he really does not have to get his hands dirty, but he is right there helping out regularly.

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4874.JPG
Views:	75
Size:	144.8 KB
ID:	142602Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4873.JPG
Views:	56
Size:	181.8 KB
ID:	142603Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4874.JPG
Views:	75
Size:	144.8 KB
ID:	142602


Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4874.JPG
Views:	75
Size:	144.8 KB
ID:	142602Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4873.JPG
Views:	56
Size:	181.8 KB
ID:	142603Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4875.JPG
Views:	47
Size:	167.5 KB
ID:	142604


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-17-2017, 10:11 AM
Scotts's Avatar
Scotts Scotts is offline
Stuff, Just stuff
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 4,780
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post

Next week I will start trouble shooting why the one mill will shock you when touching the switch box, and table with your other hand. “Been that way for several years, just don’t touch the bed when turning on and off” was the advice I got from coworkers.

Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
Boy that is exciting, ( in a bad kind of way ) Some of those types of machines become oiled in the wrong places and become conductive, or someone machined something that was dusty and very conductive, a carbon for an EDM machine comes to mind.

I would, Lock Out Tag Out the power to the machine and open the switch box and look for broken parts or really dirty inside. Keep in mind the handle of the switch may be connected to the actual electrical switch in another part of the machine. In any case the machine should be grounded back to the electrical service panel, your ground may have failed so make sure to check basic wire connections.

If you see were a wire strand is touching a piece of metal fix it, if you do not see anything don't be surprised, you will have to see it with your meter. Set your meter to OHMS and put one lead on the switch and one lead on the bed of machine and see what you get. This is with the LOTO still in place. If you do not have over 5 meg ohms you have an issue. Find it and fix it. If you can't find it call someone that can. If this has been going on for years it has not fixed itself and I would venture a guess it is not getting closer to fixing itself.

If this is a really old machine you may have cloth covered wires in the machine and these do break down over time and this machine may need a rewire. If it does have cloth covered wire be very careful about moving them around, the cloth opens up and you have another shocking potential.

Don't just give up on fixing this, and do not be surprised if it takes quite a while to find. Keep at it. The biggest hurdle to overcome is complacent attitude about the situation since no one has been seriously injured, YET!

Keep in mind 2 tenths of an amp across your heart is enough to upset your heartbeat, this is never a good thing, if you are getting shocked from one had to another the circuit is completed from one had through the trunk of your body to the other, potentially through your heart.

Once you get this project started a few pictures would be helpful, if you need help.

Nice job on the gear replacement. There may be a linkage broken in the machine that lets you engage that gear when threading, If you have a parts diagram that may help you find a missing part as well.

Glad your having fun and earning a pay check.

Scott
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.