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  #11  
Old 12-29-2017, 07:51 PM
duckman903 duckman903 is offline
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I'm always leary of chinese stuff but I've run one of there blades for more than 2 years, and this was being used almost daily, then it went dull when a piece of stock was being cut with a hidden dowel pin in it, yeah really dull, so I bought a Starrett blade in the first cut it started to wander (2" round CRS) by the 3rd cut it was JUNK took it back to the vendor who wanted to replace it I said NO want my money back, vendor stated he would have a Starrett rep. contact me , rep. contacted me and tried to get me to try another blade, said no I only get burnt once, am now running Lenox not thrilled with the weld blade cuts alright but saw jumps every time the weld gets to the roller guides. Just my rant.
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  #12  
Old 12-30-2017, 12:05 PM
BukitCase BukitCase is offline
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Doubt if I'll be buying another Starrett blade either - bought 3 of their "intense" blades for my little saws, first one I put on made maybe a half dozen cuts and stripped off teeth in 3 different places, NONE of which were at the weld. Just plain ole NEW mild steel.

And yes, I know about the "3 tooth rule"... Steve
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  #13  
Old 12-30-2017, 04:18 PM
Scratch Scratch is offline
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Originally Posted by BukitCase View Post
Doubt if I'll be buying another Starrett blade either - bought 3 of their "intense" blades for my little saws, first one I put on made maybe a half dozen cuts and stripped off teeth in 3 different places, NONE of which were at the weld. Just plain ole NEW mild steel.

And yes, I know about the "3 tooth rule"... Steve
Wait... I don't know about the 3 tooth rule... Enlighten me please.
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  #14  
Old 12-30-2017, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Scratch View Post
Wait... I don't know about the 3 tooth rule... Enlighten me please.


You should have at least 3 teeth in the cut at all times. So you size the number of teeth per inch according to the thickness of material you cut. That being said, tubing and pipe are hard in blades because it is hard to get three teeth in 1/16” thick material, so you need a higher tooth count blade. But when you switch to thicker materials, you should change to coarse tooth blade.

Probably the best thing that you can do to the small saws is to upgrade the spring tension for feeding to an air cylinder that you can control the down feed better. When the blade is sharp, you want it to just cut without a lot of pressure.


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  #15  
Old 12-30-2017, 09:33 PM
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allessence allessence is online now
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I have 2 wonderful saws.. Greeny Gobbler (Johnson JH) and then Miss Betzy DoAll..

Make all my own bands in house.. I have found that depending on the quality of metal being cut depends on how long the blades last or will cut straight..

Lot of the steel is imported now and it has inclusions in it.. Hit one of those and the blade is junk unless you can friction saw with it..

When ever I am cutting Diamond plate or some other less than stellar material and it's 5/16" or under I ramp up the RPM's and just friction saw after the blade goes dull.. I'll run it like that till it snaps and then it goes into the scrap pile..

Keeping a sharp blade properly tensioned on any saw is the key to longevity but with the crap materials I have ran into in the last few years it's rather poor..
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  #16  
Old 12-31-2017, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
...You should have at least 3 teeth in the cut at all times. So you size the number of teeth per inch according to the thickness of material you cut. That being said, tubing and pipe are hard in blades because it is hard to get three teeth in 1/16” thick material, so you need a higher tooth count blade. But when you switch to thicker materials, you should change to coarse tooth blade...
And some places say that you should have no more than 5-6 teeth in the cut. Both rules are great if you're always cutting the same material but in a jobbing shop where you can cut a lot of different stuff in one day you'd go nuts--not to mention all the time lost--if you changed blades every time you changed materials.

We've had an Ellis 1600 bandsaw for almost 30 years and, after a bit of experimentation at the beginning, we run only M42 bi-metal blades in a 5-8 vari-tooth pattern. We cut everything from .065" wall steel tubing to 10" wide alum. flat with the same blades. The blades we're using now--we've tried a few different brands--come from Germany and seem to stand up well. If one of us doesn't do something stupid and break a few teeth off the blades seem to stay sharp for a long time. Most often we break'em before they go dull...
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  #17  
Old 01-01-2018, 02:06 PM
BukitCase BukitCase is offline
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Keith, that works OK with REAL bandsaws, even my Jet 6x10 does OK - but it doesn't work with the little 4x6 NON-feed rate saws UNLESS you "help" the feed rate with your hand (slowing it down) - I get away with doing that, but it's too much of a PITA for doing a BUNCH of "too thin for the blade" stuff 'cause you can't walk away from the cut doing it that way.

If I'm gonna be doing a LOT of thinwall tube on my little saws I'll switch to an 18 tooth, otherwise I keep a 10-14 variable pitch on 'em.

somebody mentioned adding a feed rate cylinder to the little ones, I might look into that eventually... Steve
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  #18  
Old 01-01-2018, 09:19 PM
racer-john racer-john is offline
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Default Cheap band saw

Originally posted by Cutter
If this is a 4 x 6 bandsaw the blades are generally about $10-$12
I wish I could buy my blades for that price,
up here @Pricess Auto/Busy Bee a 64-1/2 x 1/2 bi-metal blade is $23.00
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  #19  
Old 01-01-2018, 11:21 PM
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OZWELDER OZWELDER is offline
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What has worked for me on a 4 x 6 generic horizontal band saw:

Your bandsaw blade tooth count must suit the thickness of cut. Basically, the rule of thumb is 3 teeth must be in the metal wall thickness at any one time.

Buy the best quality blade you can afford and set it so it is aligned square to the base and square to the back vice jaw.



The blade guide rollers are the whole key to this, in that while they are adjustable, sometimes they do require a degree of fettling to permit the degree of inclination required to adjust to square.

My guide rollers came not having enough angle of adjustment and had to have the slot in the guides opened a little to permit enough rotation angle of the rollers to achieve the square alignments.

It is one thing to have the guides square.To keep the guides in position and not have them slip is another.

Are the washers under the locking screws thick enough.? If thin, incorrectly thicknessed washers are used they can collapse or dish leaving the screw not tensioning tight enough to resist the torquing action of the blade on the roller guide assembly.The guides can slip out of "square" position. I spun some thick washers from a bar in my lathe.

The guides can be twisted out of "set adjustment" by the natural offset and constant pressure of the blade because of a collapsing skinny washer does not allow the bolt to be tightened sufficiently enough to retain the roller guide in the "square" position.

Running in your new blade is essential.I have been doing this now for a few years and the blade life is excellent. I found the following info at a bandsaw sales company.

http://www.bandsawblade.com/help/bla...-in-procedure/

This band saw blade company had some excellent info on bandsaw blade troubleshooting.
http://www.bandsawblade.com/help/bla...hooting-guide/

Lastly, some helpful info on B/saw blade chips and troubleshooting.

http://www.sawcalc.com/cutting-factors

For me, it was well worth taking the trouble to read.

I hope it is the same for you.

Ozwelder
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Last edited by OZWELDER; 01-01-2018 at 11:37 PM.
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