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Old 05-15-2008, 05:33 PM
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Default Welding History

This weld is from 1925 and was in the ground till 2003. The quarter is for scale. The inside is terrible, the weld bubbled in places and did not penetrate in others. Later when we cut this weld out I will do photos. Testing was with water pressure, no x-ray.
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Old 05-15-2008, 10:53 PM
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good thing they didnt have nuke plants back then... we would all be toast..
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  #3  
Old 05-16-2008, 06:01 PM
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Default Hang on a cotton pickin minute there

I think you guys are being a bit hard there.If the weld dates back to 1925 then obviously the QA standards also date back to 1925.

Hindsights a great thing 83 years later,but think what those welders had available to them at that time in terms of materials, machines and quality assurance process.

Remember ,no x ray, no ultra sound. Probably only visual inspection maybe die check. Did they have angle grinders to repair the mistakes? Probably not!

The key to the quality application would be what the application was.

In any case it was not stated what the application was. Obviously it has not been a hazard to anyone in the time it has been buried.

Of more immediate concern to us all, should should be the quality of the welding that is evident in some modern day application. What should be expected as quality welding on far too many modern day applications is just not there.


It is about fitness for purpose my friends.
If it was an old water or sewer line there is no great problem with a few minor defects.If it was a steam line its a different matter all together.

The purpose determines the minimum quality required.


Ozwelder
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Old 05-16-2008, 07:01 PM
yorkiepap yorkiepap is offline
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Hey OLD MAN,
Interesting find. Taking into considerations the age, buried & subjected to heat/cold, wet/dry, and soil acids, it would say that was a pretty good weld. I can see the direction of travel and obviously was stick welded. Back in '25, the metallurgical chemistries and alloying were in the primal stages of development as were the coatings of welding rods. The longevity of the weld to withstand the time span of 83 years and still maintain the integrity of the joint does simply indicate the professionalism of those era weldors. Of course, in that era, the majority of "craft" workers were immigrants who lived by a code that their work ethic was being always "first class", as it reflected their heritage & values. Their name was at stake with inference to their honor & peer respect. Most of that mentality has slowly disappeared with each of the generations after my own era('43). It would be interesting to see a cross-section cut of that weld.... Thanks for the post on some history of early welding...... Denny
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  #5  
Old 05-16-2008, 07:03 PM
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Default Natural Gas

It was a 20" natural gas pipe line that served well for it's whole life. I am amazed by the weld. It looks like they built it up on the outside for whatever they could not see on the inside. It was hydro tested before it was covered. Those old guys did a good job with what they had. In it's youth it carried 1000# but that was reduced to 480# in about 1965.

It will be a month but after we cut it out, we will photo the inside, it's really bad.

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  #6  
Old 05-16-2008, 07:35 PM
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Somewhere, I have a copy of a WW1 documentary, showing Germans stick welding u-boats together, welding with one hand and holding the "mask-on-a-stick" with the other, the other startling thing was their QA testing, they put the welders in the sub and took it down to 70 meters / 225 feet, to test the hull. A real incentive to do a good job!!. The welding machines were huge about the size of a full size Chevy van.

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Old 05-17-2008, 02:28 AM
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Good weld!!
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  #8  
Old 05-17-2008, 10:23 AM
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In 1925 welding was still pretty much in it infancy. It not until WW 2 that really great strides were made in welding technology. Welding became a faster way of assembling the ships as opposed to using rivets.
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Old 05-17-2008, 11:09 AM
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Even in the 2nd ww there were a lot of bad welds done. Mostly due to fact so much was OJT to get people into wartime jobs.I think if the weld was done in 1925 with the test method of the day and it made it 83 years it was a good weld.
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Old 05-17-2008, 02:52 PM
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i hope im not breaking any rules but i thought you lads might like to see these. i found them on another us site under texas weave. its great to think someone thought to save these. beautiful f/j
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