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  #1  
Old 10-03-2008, 06:20 PM
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Default Drywall support in a metal building

Well, the county has decided I'm going to be drywalling my new shop building. We won't be doing the ceiling but do have to cover the walls all the way up.

Anyone have any helpful hints or neat products to facilitate this? Unless someone has a better idea we'll be doing standard stud framing inside the girts around the walls.

Planning to turn the studs sideways so it's a slimmer profile and I lose a little less floor space. Also planning on going to 24" centers to save on materials since it's not structural at all.

Thoughts?
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Old 10-03-2008, 06:39 PM
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Default Maybe steel?

I hate drywall in a shop environment!
It is just too weak to be practical.
Can I assume that it is for fire code reasons?
If so, can you go to steel panels?
It will give you a higher fire rating, you can get it already painted white, (which you should want), and it will take up less room.
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Old 10-03-2008, 07:07 PM
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Seems it'd be much easier to add furring strips up the wall to catch the sheetrock. Wouldn't even have to be 2x4s though that would give you more strength should there be an impact.
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Last edited by dubby; 10-03-2008 at 07:16 PM. Reason: re-read the shop build...
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Old 10-03-2008, 08:15 PM
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If the budget will stand think of the bottom sheet as water resistant .May help if you ever do a washdown. How does sheetrock stand cost wise to durarock ?I know another trip to the zoning boys.
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Old 10-03-2008, 08:50 PM
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Only half of the building is the shop. The other half, belonging to SWMBO was always destined to have drywall.

I'll check into steel sheeting but I really doubt I can afford it. And yes, it's fire code.

2x2 furring may be feasible on the short walls where there's a fairly even set of steel girts to attach to. On the long walls there's a single girt at 7 1/2' that sticks out. I don't think the furring strips would be strong enough due to the large open span they have to cover between the floor and that girt.

Will look into water resistance. Considering the building is conditioned and there are no floor drains, I can't see doing a washdown, but certainly not a bad idea.

Thanks guys.
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Old 10-03-2008, 09:35 PM
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Don't use wood. Go to a commercial drywall supply and get either resilient channel or regular furring or hat channel. It is only 7/8 wide and has two flat side flanges that allow you to simply screw the channel to the steel. It would frame 15 times faster. I'd just use the furring channel. The resilient channel would work if that is all you could get.


Here's a l;ink to what it looks like. http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...3Doff%26sa%3DN

You can get some 1 5/8 track to frame around the openings. Just bend one side flat to make an angle out of it and then frame away. I can't begin to tell you how many metal buildings I have framed out that way.
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Old 10-03-2008, 09:40 PM
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Thanks Don! I knew there had to be a better idea.

Any other thoughts on the long walls and whether this stuff would handle the 7.5' open span between the floor and the first girt?
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Old 10-03-2008, 09:49 PM
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It won't like 7.5'. If you get a heavy gauge channel, that would span that I believe. If not, the regular 22 ga would do it if you put a strong back in the middle. That can be a heavy gauge metal stud or even horizontal 2x4's. Just brace it back to either the wall or run another stiffback vertically every 10' or so to brace the horizontal off. Did that make sense?

What do you have at the floor? If the gave you a purlin or floor girt that has an inside flange to screw to, you are good....if not, just get more 1 5/8 track and set the channel in that for a bottom track.

If this isn't clear, lemme know. I framed commercial metal for a very long time...sometimes I am clear to no one but myself.
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Old 10-05-2008, 06:16 PM
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Thanks Don. It does make sense.

Here's where we stand:

We're going to spray fire retardant on the ceiling. That part's covered. For the walls we just have to have them covered until the inspections are done and the CO is granted.

SWMBO is none too happy about losing all the space between the insulated walls and the drywall, even though it's only a few inches. She wants to put in false walls and use that extra space for storage. It's a fine idea but won't pass inspection.

The end walls will probably get furred out with hat channel and covered. The longer walls are going to get studded and drywalled for now with the expectation that they'll probably be completely redone in the very near future. I'm not at all enthused about redoing the work, but SWMBO MBO.
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Old 10-05-2008, 06:29 PM
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Just a thought. If your looking for some impact resistance look into using something like Durarock. It's tough but could get a little expensive and since it's made with concrete (I assume) it's fire resistant.
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